Birdies in the back yard.

This weekend was the Big Garden Birdwatch in the UK and because my little back yard has been quite busy with bird visitors recently, I decided to join in. Apparently the Big Garden Birdwatch, organized by the rspb is the world’s largest wildlife survey! From previous years results the data collected has shown which birdlife is thriving and which breeds are not doing so well. Once common garden visitors such as the starling are now on the decline, though numbers of the tiny wren are happilly……on the up. Through January both of these birdie breeds have frequented my yard. Of course when you only have one hour to record the species that visit, its pot luck which , if any , will turn up. πŸ˜‰

Female sparrow.

The survey was short and sweet…..and quite relaxing too. The idea being that you took one hour out of your time on Friday, Saturday or Sunday to sit and watch which birds appear. I chose an hour on Friday morning, settling down with a brew, cereal bar and my Big Garden Birdwatch Pack.

For what seemed like ages, I sat there wondering if anyone would arrive. 😐 But then luckilly a sparrow and a dunnock turned up. Dunnocks are shy brown and grey birds that mostly forage on the ground ,as they like to nibble what has dropped from the feeders.

Male Blackbird.

My next visitor was a male blackbird. He and his mate are frequently seen feeding on the fat balls, swinging on the feeder. I was pleased to see him.

Bluetit.

The true acrobats at the feeders are the pretty bluetits with their yellow fronts and black eye stripes. Usually I see quite a few enjoying the half coconut shells , but during the hour, only one graced the yard with its presence.

Snowdrops. πŸ™‚

So there you go, I recorded 4 bird species in the hour. Not as good as I hoped, but it was still interesting and I hope my filled in survey helps the RSPB.

Did you take part this year?

What wildlife visits you?

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25 thoughts on “Birdies in the back yard.”

  1. We didn’t do this, but there are loads of birds around here. We often see birds of prey and magpies at the allotment, and I used to see a lot of owls on my drive to work when I had to leave earlier than I do now.

  2. I love birds and am happy to see yours. In the US we have different kinds than over there to a degree, although what you call a bluetit looks like our bluejays. The local ones are very large, like mourning doves almost in length.

  3. Aww lovely post. I participated in the count to. I managed to see the usual suspects, but numbers in my yarden have been low this January too. I am glad you participated, you may have more species of bird next year. It takes the birds a while to find our feeders. I think your picture of the ‘dunnock’ is actually a female sparrow. Dunnocks have pointed beaks for insect feeding while your picture has a finch like beak, more for eating seeds. I think it’s a sparrow. xxx

  4. Yes I did mine this morning, not a single starling and impossible to count the sparrows! I gather from the pet shop that they sold a lot of bird food this last fortnight, everyone wanted to count birds, I think they must all be very well fed!

  5. I get blue tits (LOVE them) and a robin. There’s also a fat pigeon who adores peanuts, but I try to make sure he doesn’t get in before the smaller birds.

  6. I had the same initial panic that there wouldn’t be any birds on Saturday morning that were willing to brave the drizzle! I managed to spot 6 different species in the end though, so feel like it was a successful watch!

  7. I also did the big bird watch too – despite the weather we had a few visitors, will blog about them in a day or two. Did you try the Bird Bites recipe that came in the pack? We did and they were nom nom nom πŸ™‚

    1. Thank you, thats very kind. πŸ™‚
      I have done this a couple of times( very fortunate to be nominated) so I won’t do another for now. Thanks again and I have given you a follow back. πŸ™‚

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