Hawthorn’s Photo Scavenger Hunt ~ August.

I feel like I haven’t had my blogging head on for ages! But never fear, I am back. And feeling refreshed, from a lovely twelve night break on the West coast of Scotland. I thought I would ease back into the blogosphere by joining in with Hawthorn/Kate’s Photo Scavenger Hunt. This month she has chosen words that are homophones. That is, two or more words having the same pronunciation but different meanings, origins or spellings. I thought I would look through my recent holiday pictures…and hope for the best. πŸ™‚

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Tea/Tee. So I chose tea…as in a pudding we had for our tea, one evening in a cosy cabin in Slockavullin. Slockavullin might sound Scandinavian, but it is in fact a little village in Kilmartin Glen, Argyll. The cabin was set in a small orchard in the owners garden and as the trees were laden with apples and plums, what better idea than to make a crumble….And very tasty it was too. πŸ™‚

Thyme/ Time. How’s this photo for bath time? Our Slockavullin cabin had its very own outdoor bath tub. I never did try out alfresco bath time, much to my lasting regret. My only excuse being, our time in Kilmartin Glen was short and quite drizzly and chilly. If you like the look of this cabin, look for ‘peaceful cabin in Kilmartin Glen’ on airbnb !

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Aisle/ Isle. Most of our break away was actually spent in the Outer Hebrides on the Isle of North Uist, which is connected to Berneray in the North and Benbecula, South Uist and Eriskay in the South, by short causeway roads. To get to the Uists , we travelled to the Isle of Skye and then caught a ferry from Uig on Skye to Lochmaddy in North Uist. I absolutely loved my time there. The stunning white sandy beaches, turquoise sea and amazing wildlife, its all true. And definitely worth the journey!

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Fairy/Ferry. Whilst on Skye, we didn’t get that much chance to explore, as our short time there were basically stopovers, on the way to and from North Uist. We did however visit Fairy Glen, a strange other-worldly landscape in the hills above Uig. Grassy knolls, tiny lochans, and even a fairylike rock castle, all made for an enchanting diversion.

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Flour/Flower. Ah the wildflowers. There were so many of them adorning the Scottish Countryside, especially on the islands. The Outer Hebrides are known for their fertile low lying grassy plains called Machair, which in the Summer months are a riot of colour. I think these cornflower blue blooms are devils-bit Scabious.

My Own Choice. I shall return with posts about our trip to The Outer Hebrides and also our time in Kilmartin Glen. Let me leave you with a bench with a view! This viewing point on the island of Berneray is perfect for watching a colony of common seals. We spent quite a while there before taking Hugo for a run on the stunning white sands, further along the coast. πŸ™‚

Please check out Hawthorn’s Scavenger Hunt for more scavenger hunt posts tommorrow.

I’ve walked 1000 Miles. 😁😁

You may remember that at the start of 2018 I decided to join in with the #walk1000miles challenge. There’s a great group on facebook, full of inspirational people who are doing/have done, just that! My hope was to walk 1000 miles by the end of the year. And amazingly I hit that milestone, this weekend. πŸ™‚

My Brother In Law found a great little walk for us to do, starting and finishing at The Inn at Whitewell in the Forest of Bowland AONB. It took in a 19th century cheese press, river stepping-stones, about a thousand pheasants ( no exaggeration!) and of course a good dog- friendly country Inn.

Don’t worry though, I intend to keep on walking and am now aiming to walk another 500 miles by the end of December. Although I have always enjoyed a good walk ( and you kind of have to , as a dog’s human) , I have definitely shyed away from longer routes and hills. The #walk1000miles challenge has absolutely made me more enthusiastic about grabbing my walking boots and getting out there!

Also its a really fun thing to do with friends and family. You never know what you may come accross. πŸ™‚

And every walk should end with a drink at the pub, or cake, or both….😁

Sightseers at Lowther Castle~ with Picnic Cinema.

So I have a 25 Before 45 Bucket List , which I have been neglecting recently. Still lots to do on there and not very much time left to do it ! Oh well C’est la Vie. Something I listed was ‘ Watch a film outdoors’ and the other weekend I did manage to cross this off my Bucket list, when I dragged Wil up to Lowther Castle in Cumbria, for an open-air cinema event.

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Lowther Castle.

Picnic Cinema specialises in bringing ‘cinema parties’ to some of the most scenic and iconic locations in the North, including castles, forests and in the case of cult classic ‘Withnail & I’ , a remote farmhouse that was used as a location in the movie.

It turned out that a favourite film of both mine and Wils ‘ Sightseers’ was showing at Lowther Castle, a once grand residence now in ruins, but still majestic all the same. Even though Lowther is only a couple of miles from where my Mum lives, I decided to book us camping tickets, as the lovely weather was perfect for an evening under canvas.

The weekend before,the Lowther estate had played host to the ‘Kendal Calling’ music festival, but this was the first time anyone had been allowed to camp so close to the castle , so we felt quite privileged. The fairy tale turrets certainly made for a magical backdrop.

It also happened that a Crafty Vintage fair was underway in the castle courtyard, so there was plenty to keep us entertained after we had pitched the tent.

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Being the rubbish picnickers that we were, we actually forgot to pack a picnic! Couldn’t get enough of this delicious pizza though. 😁

The Picnic Cinema entertainment commenced at around 8pm. We wrapped up warm and took camping chairs, blankets, wine, snacks, and a torch up to where the film screen was situated.

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We were each given a cute goodie bag containing love-heart sweets, a sherbert dib dab, a pencil, a badge and a jigsaw puzzle piece! While we were waiting for the sun to go down, the Picnic Cinema team entertained us with a sightseeing themed quiz, filmed interviews with some obliging campers and various fun and games.

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At around 10.15pm it was dark enough for the movie to begin!

If you have never seen Sightseers, then you have missed a treat. Its a British Black Horror Comedy about a couple who go on a touring caravan holiday, visiting various tourist attractions on the way….and leaving a few dead bodies in their wake….. Filmed in the North ( Derbyshire, Yorkshire & The Lake District) , Sightseers is pretty macabre and totally bonkers! It was great to see it on The Big Screen. 😁

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I think I would definitely go again to a Picnic Cinema event. I love that the films are screened in such gorgeous settings, the staff were enthusiastic, helpful and friendly and the movies shown are usually quirky and different.

Still to show this Summer.

Saturday 11th August ~ The Big Lebowski at Muncaster Castle, Cumbria.

Saturday 18th August ~ 24 Hour Party People at Kirklinton Hall, Carlisle.

Saturday 22nd September ~ Moulin Rouge at The Festival of Thrift, Redcar.

Whilst in the Lowther area we decided to do our own spot of sightseeing. ‘Long Meg and Her Daughters’ at Hunsonby is a druid stone circle that was used as one of the locations in the film.

Have you ever watched a film outdoors? Are you tempted?

Now, back to that Bucket List!

Heather and Haweswater.

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Haweswater is a reservoir in the valley of Mardale in the North East of the Lake District. In the 1930’s this four mile stretch of water was created from the original smaller lake and the flooding of the picturesque Mardale Valley. Two villages, various farms and ‘ The Dun Bull Inn’ were destroyed, so that Manchester and other urban areas could benefit from a decent water supply. The reservoir still provides a good percentage of the North West’s water.

At the moment Haweswater’s water levels are much lower than usual, so it is possible to see the remains of the sunken village of Mardale Green, at the top end of the lake. However after parking at the Haweswater Hotel ( the only residence on the lakeside) and enjoying a spot of lunch, time restricted our planned walk to the ruins. Instead we ambled a couple of miles along the road to a heather strewn viewing point, the purple blooms are just coming into flower, and make for a beautiful backdrop. 😊

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Possibly a Silver Y Moth, but please let me know if I am wrong…

The Haweswater Hotel was built in 1937 by the Manchester Corporation, after the flooding of the valley. Inside it is decorated in an impressive Art Deco style, harking back to it’s 1930’s beginnings. We actually stopped there in 2016 for a couple of nights…and it was almost empty of guests. Happily this Summer’s beautiful weather and the ‘reappearance of the village in the reservoir’ have peeked tourists curiosity, concerning this lesser known (though still idyllic) area of The Lake District….

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Have you seen any heather blooming yet? Its still quite early, so it was lovely to see this pretty plant already flowering on the banks of the lake.

Have you ever been to Haweswater?