Sculptures along the river Eden.

The River Eden is truly Cumbrian. Beginning high in the fells of Mallestang at its source, it meanders it’s way some ninety miles through Eastern Cumbria up towards Carlisle, and finally merging with other rivers as it enters The Solway Firth. Some twenty years ago ten sculptures were commissioned to celebrate the history and beauty of the area, they are The Eden Benchmarks and I’m hoping to discover them all.

There are other riverside features too. Wil , Hugo and I visited Lacy’s Caves , five chambers cut into the red sandstone cliffs along the Eden at Little Selkeld. Also nearby is a Druid Stone Circle Long Meg & Her Daughters. Faces cut into the rocks by the river at Armathwaite and more red sandstone caves at Wetheral are on my list of places to see. πŸ™‚

The River Eden at Langwathby.
Lacy’s Caves at Little Selkeld.
Long Meg and her Daughter’s.
South Rising.

Eden Benchmark Sculptures seen so far.

South Rising. Carved from local Lazonby red sandstone, South Rising by Vivien Mousdell is situated on The Ladies Walk at Edenhall near Langwathby. It comprises of two curved rock seats, apparently representing the rivers perpetual journey and the annual migrations of the Eden’s fish and birds. Although not terribly intricate , this sculpture has stood the test of time, twenty years hasn’t weathered the carving too much. Though it was quite hard to find amongst the undergrowth! The Ladies Walk is especially nice in the summer with river, cornfield and woodland views. Lots of wild flowers and the possibility of refreshments at The Edenhall Hotel.

Vista in Coombs Wood.
Vista.
Beware of Adders!
River Eden at Armathwaite.

Vista. Definitely my favourite of the Eden Benchmarks we’ve seen so far is Vista by Graeme Mitcheson. Carved into a large sandstone boulder are the discarded boots, clothing and map of a walker who has decided to chance a paddle ( or maybe even a wild swim) in the river below. Vista is situated in Coombs Wood, a pleasant riverside walk from the lovely village of Armathwaite. Below the sculpture ( and unbeknownst to us at the time) are several carved faces in the cliffs as well as a poem etched into the red sandstone. Definitely a reason to return, maybe when the bluebells are out in the spring.

Cypher Piece. In the picnic area near the Eden Bridge at Lazonby lies Cypher Piece by Frances Pelly. Two adjacent rocks have been carved with clues about the Eden’s human history. Unfortunately this benchmark has really succumbed to nature and moss covers the entire piece. We could make out a fish but other detail such as a Celtic horses head, a ram’s horn and a Norse Tomb Decoration were invisible to our untrained eyes.

Cypher Piece at Lazonby.
Cypher Piece.

Red River. Looking out over the Eden at Temple Sowerby, Red River by Victoria Brailsford can be accessed by a footpath from the cricket field at the North of the village. This local Lazonby sandstone sculpture is still in good nick, the steps are carved with water ripples, the balls apparently representing large pebbles in fast flowing water. Not far from Temple Sowerby is NT Acorn Bank where we saw our first Eden Valley Red Squirrel in its adjacent woodland. πŸ™‚

Red River at Temple Sowerby.
Red River.
Pink Berries in Temple Sowerby.

So there you have it, four of the ten Eden Benchmark Sculptures and six more to find…

Have you come across any of them?

Do you have any interesting sculptures near you?

18 thoughts on “Sculptures along the river Eden.”

    1. Absolutely. Although I believe the committee that was looking after the Sculptures and surroundings had to disband in 2009 due to the funding being pulled, so I think the sculptures have had to fend for themselves since then. X

  1. I love that first photo of Hugo and the River Eden at Langwathby – it looks almost like an oil painting and I’m sure would look good enlarged and framed πŸ™‚

    1. Aw thanks, I never thought of that. Looking forward to seeing more of the river and meadows there in Spring and Summer, the wildflowers are so beautiful there. And of course Hugo loves the water. πŸ™‚

  2. I think we found most of these back when they were first installed but I cannot remember any of them! It is lovely that they are all still there and being slowly absorbed by Mother Nature.

  3. A sculpture tr ail can certainly add a focus to a walk, providing they blend in with the environment and aren’t too obtrusive. Looks like that’s the case with these.

    1. Hi, oh no those first pics were taken in the summer. It’s gotten a lot colder now, though not as cold as you. When the other pics were taken in November it was a mild 8 degrees, but still needed a coat. Today has been a frosty minus two! Still that’s mild for you guys…

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