Hawthorns October Scavenger Hunt. 🍁

Words for October 2020.

Sweet treat ~ The best October Sweet Treat I have enjoyed is this Mocha Plate at The Shepherd’s Inn in Melmerby. Soo good.

Starts with a ….W… ~ The beautiful Wood carving of a bird of prey in Fitz Park in Keswick looks amazing surrounded by Autumn colours.

Reading now ~ PINE by Francine Toon, which is described on the blurb as A Literary Gothic thriller that chills to the marrow. Yikes!

Hobby/crafting ~ I am not a crafter so I will have to show you some of the pretty painted pebbles I have come across over the last few months. Two were on a little roadside stall and one ( the beautiful Oyster catcher) was painted for me by the very generous Blackpool blogger Bea. πŸ™‚

Something Purple ~ Not sure what these purple tipped plants are? I know them as Mother and Chicks for some reason , they seem very content on stone walls.

My own choice ~ This is not my photo, but shamelessly stolen from a friend. Bruno and Bradley are her family pets. Talk about bunnies that do brunch. Any captions ? πŸ‡πŸ˜Š

Bob over to Kate’s Blog for the October Link Up Party.

A Washed Out Witchy Wander.

My sister, niece and nephew and I ( and Hugo, of course) had planned to do the Walking With Witches Trail , a 4 mile loop starting at Barley Car Park. The pretty villages of Barley, Newchurch and Roughlee lie in the shadow of Pendle Hill. The area is famed for its spooky associations with The Pendle Witches , a group of individuals who in the 1600s were sentenced to death for witchcraft. Of course the day we set off on our witchy wander it was chucking it down with rain and the foreboding bulk of Pendle Hill was enveloped in mist.

We only managed to follow the trail from Barley to nearby Newchurch over boggy fields, before calling it a day and turning back. I didn’t take many photos, but still thought I would share with you what we did see between showers. The scarlet and yellow waxy cap mushrooms we spied along the way are a fairly good indicator of ancient meadowlands.

Newchurch is named after its ‘ new church’ of St Mary’s consecrated in 1554. The west side of the churches tower is unusual for its Eye Of God. Can you see it? Maybe the eye was there to watch over the locals, more likely it was used as a window by the bell-ringers, so they could view approaching service goers. Whichever, it is a little bit spooky on a grey Lancashire day.

St Mary’s Church with its Eye Of God.
Leaning head stones in the churchyard.

To the right of the churches porch is a Nutter family grave, inscribed with a skull and crossbones, athough it is unlikely that Alice Nutter herself was buried here. Alice Nutter was a land owning gentlewoman from nearby Roughlee. She had been involved in a boundary dispute with her neighbor , local magistrate Christopher Nowell. Maybe the dispute was easily solved when Alice herself was conveniently found to be one of the 12 people in the area sentenced to death for witchcraft.

Nutter family grave.
It is unlikely Alice was buried here as ‘ witches’ were not buried in consecrated ground.

Although the superstitious times of the 17th century are thankfully over, there is a little shop in Newchurch that sells all things witchy, so we couldn’t resist a mooch…and shelter from the rain.

Snap of Witches Galore from their website.

Inside Witches Galore there is certainly plenty to look at. My sister purchased a painted Pendle witch pebble and as for myself? An ornamental toadstool. πŸ™‚

Witches above.
Witches all around.

If only we could have used Pendle Transport ( broomsticks!) for our journey back to the car. We settled on walking to Barley along the road instead of through the muddy fields. Another time we will do the whole Walking With Witches Trail. There is so much more to explore!

πŸ§™β€β™€οΈπŸŽƒ

Walk From Nest On The Hill.

It does feel like all I post about is walking this year. I suppose that is very true! Before this Sunday morning hike from the Nick O Pendle , we also enjoyed a tasty breakfast at the super cute Nest On The Hill , a newly opened little cafe in a cabin at The Wellsprings restaurant. Wil had a sausage butty and I devoured yummy french toast with melted chocolate and blackberry compote. Hugo was made a fuss of by the lovely young couple who run this quirky bruncherie ( hope bruncherie is a word! ), that serves warming food & drinks before the main restaurant opens for lunch. The Nest is also packed with locally sourced gifts and crafts. Lots of present ideas. I even started my Christmas shopping!

After our food and my purchasing , Hugo for one was busting for a walk. I could have curled up on the cosy sofa in front of the toasty log burner for a while longer ,but fresh air beckoned…. We took the owners recommendation of a bridleway walk through the fields, thus avoiding the crowds who park nearby to make their way up Pendle Hill.

Pendle Ski ⛷️ Slope.
Bench with a view.
View information board.

We walked up the road and down a little , then through a gate on the right, following a farm track/ bridleway over rugged Lancashire countryside. To be totally honest I’m not really sure what this area is called, maybe Wiswell Moor. Some map perusing is needed! Anyway we basically walked as far as a field of llamas, then turned around and made our way back. A muddy 4 miles or so.

An old barn.
Rugged terrain.
Windswept tree.
Sheep’s eye view.
Approaching a conifer plantation.

We carried on toward Bramley Farm.
Passing a few houses and farms, some boarded up.
Look! Llamas.
Green fields.
Blue sky.
Looking towards Nick Of Pendle.
Sunbathing sheep.

The weather was bright and breezy, a perfect Pendle day. More from Pendle Hill coming soon hopefully. πŸ₯Ύ

Nest On The Hill. A cozy Pendle Gem.

Autumn walk to Dunsop Bridge. πŸ„πŸ₯ΎπŸ

We joined my sister and kids for a walk along the river Hodder into Dunsop Bridge, a village that claims to be at the very centre of the UK. Lots of Autumn colours and plenty of fungi finds too. We parked by the stone bridge over the river just outside Whitewell.

River Hodder.
Pheasant.
A Lonk Tup.
A mushroom that looks like a small fried egg.
Bridge over the Hodder.
My sister navigates a wonky bridge.
Riverside.
One of two stone otters by the river outside Thorneyholme Hall.
Another bridge, near Thorneyholme Hall.
Honey Fungi, possibly.
Thorneyholme Hall, currently empty I think.
More unidentified Fungi.
And more amongst the leaves.
https://www.ribblevalley-e-bikes.co.uk/ opened in the village over Lockdown.
Anyone know what this is by the bridge?
Fun in the leaves.
Shaggy Inkcap.
Hello Ewe.
On our way back we crossed over the bridge. However if you have a dog, you may have to carry your pooch over, due to the holes in it. πŸ™ƒ
Another Hodder view.
Autumn colours.
Walking back to the car.

This walk was a very enjoyable 4 miles, with a brew and biscuits bought from Puddleducks Tea Room in the village,which is presently operating as a take away. I think we will return πŸ™‚

Garrigill to Ashgill Force walk πŸ₯ΎπŸ

At the weekend we took a walk from Garrigill in the North Pennines to the nearby waterfall of Ashgill Force. We bought an Alston Moor walk leaflet in the outdoors shop in Alston for 60p.

The route begins at Garrigill’s Village Green, we parked near the village church. Garrigill looks to be a lovely little village , whose pub and shop have seen better days.

St John’s Church.
Village Green.
George and Dragon sign.

The leaflet says that there were once two pubs in Garrigill. The George & Dragon was the haunt of visiting gentry, Tories and shooting parties, whilst the Fox was for miners, poachers and Liberals!

Climb the slippy bridleway to Loaning Head.
A Loaning Head cottage.
Views across the Pennines.
Kestrel.
There are lots of very high Stiles to climb over.
Swaledale Sheep.
One moment, blue skies…
the next, sideways rain..
Meadow Cranesbill.

The weather went a bit wild and after navigating about a million steep stiles we came across the waterfall. Unfortunately we had managed to deviate from our maps directions somehow, but we got there in the end.

Gill scramblers at Ashgill Force.
Ashgill Force.

It is apparently possible to walk behind the waterfall, and indeed ‘ Dance with the Fairies’ , although it looked a bit busy with Gill Scramblers the day we visited.

Hugo was joined in the gorge by another Black Labrador boy, which would be lovely if Hugo actually liked other boy labradors. Fortunately Hugo was more interested in the stones Wil were throwing in the water, than fighting. Phew!

Labradors.
Footbridge.

The rest of the walk was more of a gentle meander, following the River South Tyne back to Garrigill.

An almost stone circle.
Another footbridge.
A beautiful place for a dip.
Fly Agarics beside the river.
Autumn colours.
Buzzard.
A mini waterfall.
Attractive stone bridge.
Hips.
And back to the church.

I really enjoyed this scenic 5 mile walk and hopefully we will try it out again, maybe when the meadows are full of wildflowers come early Summer. πŸ™‚

Fungi Finds. πŸ„

My weekend was a cornocopia of fungi finds. In rainbow colours!

A lovely lady in Melmerby showed me the ones that have sprung up on the village green. If you have ever been to this Eden Valley village, you will know that the green is huge. It’s also home to lots of gorgeous wild flowers in the spring and summer. The green is managed like an old fashioned hay meadow. It’s a real haven for wildlife.

Hope these identifications are right. I used the I naturalist app on my phone to double check. I am clueless when it comes to fungi.

Scarlet Waxy cap.
Scarlet Waxy cap gills.
Glutinous Wax cap.
Pink Wax cap aka The Ballerina.
Apricot Club.
Smokey Spindles.

Definitely feel blessed to have been shown these. My favourite has to be the ‘ Ballerina ‘.

Later on Saturday Wil and I took a walk from Garrigill to Ashgill Force. To my delight we spotted these beauties by the brook.

Fly Agaric.
Fly Agaric.

And last but not least, spotted these at home in Clitheroe.

Common Bonnets ?

Have you spotted any unusual fungi near you?

A Wander To Waddington.

Sunday was a sunny day surprise, so a walk from home beckoned. The suggestion of a wander to the nearby village of Waddington …and lunch, was an attractive proposition. We set off late morning, passing through the grounds of Clitheroe Castle, by the River Ribble and then along the road to our destination.

Clitheroe Castle ~ the second smallest castle keep in the country.
Trinity Church, built in 1887.
A track down Back Commons.
Stone steps down to the river.
Waddow Hall on the opposite side of the Ribble. The Hall is used by Girl Guiding UK.
A white washed cottage surrounded by cows.
Brungerley Bridge and a high river.
Heading into Waddington.

Apparently Waddington is named after its founder, an 8th century Anglo-Saxon chieftain called Wadda. This pretty village has probably won the accolade of Lancashire’s Best Kept Village, more than any other. The picturesque coronation gardens might have something to do with it.

Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.
Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.
War Memorial Cross.
Village centre.
St Helens Church, a focal point of the village.

There are three pubs in the village, my personal favourite being The Lower Buck, which is a friendly welcoming independent watering hole. Does delicious pub grub too, so a perfect place for lunch. It was warm enough to sit outside in the sunshine.

Lower Buck looking pretty in the Autumn sun.
Love the pub sign.
A nice surprise inside, the pub pup. ❀️
Lunch time.
And someone is watching us eat.

After dinner we headed home via the country lane to Low Moor and back into Clitheroe.

Grey Heron.
Blue sky and Pendle Hill in the very distance.
One of two stags that adorn the entrance to a farm.
The bridge to Low Moor on the outskirts of Clitheroe.

Did you enjoy a sunny Sunday?

Books Read In July, August and September. πŸ“š

My reading has slowed down again in the last few months. I have enjoyed all these books ,so I can’t say why my reading mojo has suffered. Hey ho….

The Bomber Dog ~ Megan Rix ( 2013). This is a fave book of my 12 year old nephew, which he lent me over lockdown, it’s a good story too! Grey is a clever German shepherd pup who is rescued from a bombed building in the Second World War by Nathan , just as he is on his way to train as a paratrooper. The two develop a remarkable bond and become inseparable, until the day they lose each other in Germany. A heartwarming tale about man’s best friend. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Love And Treasure ~ Ayelet Waldman ( 2014). Another book that delves back in time to World War 2. In 1945 American soldiers capture a train of riches & gold, treasure stolen from Jewish families by the Nazis. Years later Natalie Wiseman is staying with her beloved grandfather Jack , his dying wish is for Natalie to find the rightful owners of a peacock pendant he’s had in his possession since his war serving days. A thought provoking novel that spans the decades. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Salt Path ~ Raynor Winn ( 2018). Not many people would set off to walk the entire 630 mile South West Coast of England. After losing their home and livelihood Raynor and Moss are given more devastating news, Moss is diagnosed with a delibitating illness. With nothing left to lose the couple set off with a small tent and limited supplies. Told with strength and humour this memoir is a true testament to human resilience and the healing power of nature. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Reckoning ~ Yrsa Sigurdardottir ( 2019). The lasting legacy of childhood trauma is explored in this dark Icelandic thriller. This is in fact the second book in a series, but can be read as a stand alone. A schools time capsule is opened and a chilling message is inside. The names of several would be victims are on a kill list, written by a child. A demoted detective and a dissilusoned psychoanalyst struggle to solve the case. ⭐⭐⭐

Beach Read ~ Emily Henry ( 2020). Not your typical beach romance, but definitely a great holiday read. January and Gus are writers in a rut. January is a romance author who likes a fairytale ending. Gus writes dark gritty fiction. Years ago they were also college rivals with a strong attraction. Flung together over one summer, the two struggling authors decide to help each other get over their writing ruts by swapping story genres. But will channeling the demons of their pasts into their work destroy a blossoming friendship….. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Have you read any of these?

Images from Pinterest & Unsplash.