Hawthorns November Photo Scavenger Hunt.

I’m joining in as ever with Hawthorns Photo Scavenger Hunt this month. For this one I did look into my archives for a couple of pictures.

❀️

Houseplant/s ~ I have a few cacti and succulents dotted around the house. Heres my favourite planted in a stout can which I got a few years ago from a Makers Market in Manchester. So happy it’s still going strong. πŸ™‚

Ring/s ~ It’s The Singing Ringing Tree over Burnley way. A metal pipe sculpture of a twisted tree. When the wind blows through the pipes ,eerie tunes are played. Hugo was mesmerised on our visit a few years ago. πŸ˜…

Harbour ~ Staithes on the Yorkshire coast , a November visit some 5 years ago. A lovely picturesque place to amble round.

Window ~ I love this office window in town, with the town literally stenciled onto the glass. A picture perfect view of Clitheroe.

Sky ~ This was my front passenger seat vista on our journey home from the caravan in October. It felt like we were driving into those puffy white clouds.

My own choice ~ I have noticed quite a few white and black & white crows around Clitheroe recently. No photos yet, but here’s one of a bonnie blackbird with white feathers I have seen too.

Thanks for dropping by.πŸ₯°

A Trawden & Wycoller Walk inspired by the Brontes.

Although the literary Bronte family lived in Haworth in Yorkshire, it was not uncommon for the siblings to walk over the Pennine moors to the secluded hamlet of Wycoller

in Lancashire. As Sunday promised some rare dry weather ,we headed to the village of Trawden for a Circular Walk that takes in some of the rugged Pendle countryside that may have inspired their writings.

The ruins of Wycollar Hall.

The walk starts from the Trawden Arms in the village,so we found some roadside parking nearby. We then made our way up some old tram tracks to the right of the pub, crossed a main road and then followed a route through many boggy fields, moorland and woodland. It was very wet under foot, but there was lots to see. We passed several farms and smallholdings around Trawden, home to various pets and livestock.

Trawden Arms Pub.
What Ewe Lookin At? ~ my go to caption for sheep.
Cuddly Llamas.
Collie guard.
The grass is always greener…
Donkey duo.

We followed Trawden Brook up to Lumb Spout , once a popular Victorian beauty spot.

If nothing else, 2020 has been my year for finding Waxcaps.
Not the best photo of Lumb Spout.

The route then follows the Pennine National Bridleway Trail over moorland for a way. I saw a couple of stonechat but didn’t manage to get a photo. The skies were big and the ground was sodden.

Eventually we found outselves off the rugged moors and entering the serene Wycoller Country Park with its greenery, woodland, winding brook and stone bridges.

Stone Clapper Bridge.
A bracket fungi.

Wycoller is a former handloom weaving settlement, the villagers took their cloth to the drying ground above Wycoller Hall. Folk moved away to find jobs after the introduction of the powerloom in Lancashire’s industrial towns.

The Bronte sisters visited Wycoller and it is said that in Charlotte’s novel Jane Eyre , the hall was her inspiration for Ferndean Manor where Mr Rochester lived.

Wycoller Hall.
Wycoller.
Wycoller.

We ate our sandwiches here and set off to continue our walk back to Trawden, totally forgetting to go and see The Atom Panopticon sculpture which is a short stroll away. Oh well, a reason to return!

Wycoller Moggie.
A pulpit style.
Trumpet Lichen.
Pendle Hill view ~ Pendle always seems to sneek into view on our walks.
A farm cottage toward the end of our hike.

All in all this walk was about six miles long, though at quite a slow pace because of all the mud. Unlike the Bronte sisters we didn’t need to wander the soggy terrain in long gowns and petticoats! I wonder if any of the siblings ever did catch a glimpse of Pendle Hill ? It would be nice to think so….

X

Lockdown Birthday.

A lockdown birthday was never going to be the same. Celebration ideas were changed as Lancashire tiers upped levels and then a national lockdown was announced. Finally what I was left with ,still a happy time I think….a few doorstep visits from family & friends, an online party, a walk, yummy food cooked by my other half and a delicious take-away hot chocolate. The new normal isn’t so bad.

Zoom party itinerary and friends portraits of me. More flattering than photos!
A viaduct Sunday morning walk.
Hot chocolate from The Chocolate Works.
Such a lovely book.

A book to dip into everyday of Autumn. Today’s poem probably more appropriate for a frosty November day.

Heres a few verses from The Duke Of Fire and The Duchess Of Ice by Carol Ann Duffy.

Passionate love for the Duke of fire

the Duchess of Ice felt.

One kiss was her heart’s desire,

but with one kiss she would melt.

She dreamed of him in his red pantaloons,

In his orange satin blouse,

In his crimson cravat,

In his tangerine hat,

In his vermilion dancing shoes.

One kiss, one kiss,

Lips of flame on frost,

One kiss, pure bliss,

and never count the cost.

As you can probably imagine, there’s a puddle at the end of this poem….

Thanks for dropping by. ❀️

A Ribchester Ramble.

The weekend saw us head to the Ribble Valley village of Ribchester for a 5.5 circular walk, taking in squelchy fields and country lanes. Ribchester was the site of the Roman fort Bremetennacum and there are ruins of a Roman Bath House in the village. Take your wellies if you do this walk. 😁

An old cottage in Ribchester.
Love this Autumnal wreath.
Corpse Bride.
Pub sign for the White Bull.

We left the village by following the private road to Parsonage farm , where a bridleway took us into waterlogged fields.

Parsonage Farm.
Hugo loved this rainwater pond.
View through the trees.

After squelching through the fields there was some country lane walking. We kept Hugo on his lead, though we didn’t see any cars. Hothersall Lane eventually joins the Ribble Way.

Beef cows at Butchers Fold.
Butchers Fold.
Someone’s watching me…
Look out for those ducks.

Hothersall Lane winds its way down to an Outdoor Centre and then Hothersall Hall. Apparently just past the entrance of Hothersall Hall Farm there is a stone head wedged in a tree. But we couldn’t find it!

Hothersall Lane.
Autumn Leaves.
Hothersall Hall.

We climbed uphill to some trees and there were great views over the Ribble.

Hugo watching us eat sandwiches….
Heading downhill.
Fungi on a tree.
Spot the fieldfare. ❀️

We followed The Ribble Way back to the village. There are lots of interesting old buildings in Ribchester ,so it’s definitely worth a look around.

Fishing on the Ribble.
Love this house gateway.
St Wilfred’s Church, one of four local churches here.
Ribchester Roman Museum.
A column depicting Ribchester’s history.
Potters Barn Cafe is open for takeaways. I can recommend the cake. 🍰
Roman Bath House remains.
Roman Bath House remains.

It was good to visit a village less than ten miles from home, that we have rarely spent any time before.

Find this walk in Guide to Lancashire Pub Walks by Nick Burton.