Category Archives: lancashire

Foggy walk to Holcombe Tower.

I wasn’t sure that I would post about this walk we did last weekend from Ramsbottom and up through Holcombe onto the Moors, as it was such a foggy day that we saw no views to speak of. But there again it was quite atmospheric ambling through the mist searching for the Peel Monument, a tower erected in memoriam to a famed son of nearby Bury, the conservative MP and twice prime minister ‘ Sir Robert Peel’.

We had originally planned to do this circular moorland walk but due to the fog we only got as far as the tower, which was literally obscured by the murky gloom. After following a few confused looking walkers up the hill, we turned round and took a wall side path to the right and after a few minutes the tower loomed above us, emerging from the mist like a great grey ghost. On a clearer day I bet the surrounding views are impressive. The monument is sometimes open to the public and has a viewing platform, from which to admire the surrounding Lancashire and Manchester countryside.

p1000412
Walking up through Ramsbottom to Holcombe village and past the Shoulder of Mutton Pub. We had parked at the train station car park.
p1000413
The Tower stands 128 feet tall !
p1000414
Some of Holcombe Moor is looked after by the National Trust.
p1000415
The fog got thicker the higher we went.
p1000416
The tower emerges from the gloom. You can just about see that it is pretty tall compared to the diddy humans at its base.
p1000419
The tower is only open to the public when flying a white flag. This obviously wasn’t one of those days!
Apparently one of Sir Robert Peels achievements was the introduction of the Metropolitan Police Force. This may explain their ‘ Peelers ‘ and ‘ Bobby’s ‘ nick names.
p1000420
Eyeing up sandwiches…. obviously. πŸ˜‰
p1000421
Believe you will find Holcombe Tower, even on a foggy day. πŸ™‚
p1000424
Back in Ramsbottom ~ Edward Allington’s Tilted Vase Sculpture.
Refreshments in Grind & Tamp.

In the end we only managed to walk 4 miles because visibility was so poor. However this is a great reason to return and try again. πŸ™‚

Have you ever had a foggy walk?

Advertisements

Palace Cinema ~ Longridge, Lancashire.

I don’t know about you, but I have always loved going to the cinema. Yet shamefully in years gone by I have almost abandoned this film themed treat, for the comfort of watching movies ( whilst munching on kettle chips) all snug on the sofa at home.

As a child and teenager my memories of the Pictures, meant a trip into Clitheroe to the Civic Hall Cinema ( a long time closed now) where you would sink into red velvet covered seats and queue in the aisles for sweets and ice creams, sold by usherettes. The very same usherettes ( quite stern old ladies) would shine torches at you if you were misbehaving during the film ;). I for one was always mesmerised , as soon as the red velvet curtains swished open and the familiar Pearl and Dean music filled the theatre, I was engrossed in movie heaven. Modern film multiplexes just don’t have the same appeal. I was intrigued then, when I heard that the market town of Longridge near Preston still retains its original old cinema. A trip to this iconic building was a must! I immediately booked a matinee showing of the new Mary Poppins film for myself, my sister and my nephew and niece. πŸ™‚

An unassuming exterior. Image off Pinterest.

The Palace Cinema is apparently one of the oldest surviving cinemas in the North West and is tucked away between terraces on Market Place. When I told my niece and nephew we were looking for the Palace, I think they envisioned a colossal castle, not a cute little Picture House. We parked on a nearby street and followed a few families , who looked like they were heading somewhere welcoming and warm.

Movie Reels.
Adjoining bar.
Bijou foyer with ice cream counter. Image off Pinterest.

I had booked our tickets online and simply showed my phone to one of the attendants. However you can purchase tickets at the Palace as well. After bagging our seats ( they are the original red velvet covered ones πŸ™‚ ) in the packed auditorium, my sister and nephew headed to the foyer to buy drinks and popcorn. I was pleasantly surprised that paper straws were provided with our cold drinks and that they are served in paper cups and recyclable cans. Tea and coffee in china cups are Β£1.

Before the feature started an apologetic attendant told us that the adds, trailers and National Anthem wouldn’t be played that day, as they had got lost in the cloud. This did make me chuckle. Its sweet that the National Anthem is part of the whole cinema going experience here. Soon we were all lost in the whimsical and splendiferous Mary Poppins Returns, which is well worth seeing by the way. πŸ™‚

Waiting for the film to commence.
Happy customers.

The Longridge Palace retains all the charm of a vintage cinema with quirky touches and modern ideas , such as mother and baby screenings, film and book club evenings and adjoining cafΓ© and bar.

Palace Cinema ~ Market Pl, Longridge, Preston, PR3 3RR

www.thepalace-longridge.co.uk

We really enjoyed our trip to the Palace. I definitely hope to return, as I loved the whole cosy and nostalgic experience.

Do you have an old original cinema near you? Maybe its time to pay it a visit!

A Festive Afternoon Tea at Mitton Hall.

There was a time when going out for Afternoon Tea was quite the norm for me. I think one year, I managed to devour ten. I know! But in 2018 I had not participated in this delightful institution until Sunday, when I joined some work colleagues for a Festive themed afternoon tea at Mitton Hall.

Mitton Hall near Whalley in Lancashire is a charming country house hotel. It’s the kind of olde worlde pile where a medieval banquet would not look out of place in its traditional oak panelled Great Hall. At this time of year a mahusive Christmas Tree welcomes you on arrival. πŸ™‚ We immediately felt full of festive cheer.

Our Afternoon tea was booked for 5pm, so it was already dark when we arrived. After a quick refreshment in one of the cosy bars, we were lead to our table in the Brasserie.

It wasn’t long before our Afternoon Teas arrived, served on three tiers and piled high with goodies. We had all chosen the standard option which includes any hot drink of your choice and cost Β£17-50 each.

The bottom tier contained festive finger sandwiches, smoked salmon canopes and pigs in blankets. I always think it’s a shame that afternoon tea is more geared up for the sweet tooth. We would have loved a few more savoury items to feast upon.

However the cakes were to die for. And I am definitely a fan of cake! My personal favourite was the Lemon Drizzle..

Other sweet treats included a mince pie, a chocolate mousse ( unusually flavoured with mango, a hit with me but not for everyone) , a mini macaroon, a stollen bite and of course, plain and fruit scones, served with jam and clotted cream.

And after all that we just had to have a photo in front of the resplendent tree. πŸ™‚

Will you be indulging in a Christmassy afternoon tea this year?

Wildlife Moments in 2018.

Its December everyone! Is it to early to do a bit of a round-up post?? 2018 has been a pretty good year for spotting wildlife I’ve never seen before. I glimpsed my first Gannets plunging into the ocean for fish off Skye, my first Stonechats darting between fence posts and gorse bushes in Ravenglass and my first Great Crested Grebes fishing in the lagoon at Hodbarrow Nature Reserve. I witnessed my first Eider Ducks bobbing along an aquamarine blue sea in the Outer Hebrides and watched for the first time, wild otters swimming and playing in a sheltered cove there.

And this year I have tried to identify and record every flower, mammal, bird, butterfly and moth I have come across whilst out and about , in a Nature Diary. Doing this has definitely got me busy looking up everything in my often neglected wildlife guides. My diary has gotten quite full, though I know there are still so many plants and animals, that I haven’t had the pleasure of viewing in our beautiful British Isles.

Here are just a few photos of some of the wildlife I have managed to capture on camera this year. πŸ™‚

P1000354
Great Crested Grebe fishing whilst sporting winter plumage ~ Hodbarrow Nature Reserve, Haverigg, Cumbria.
P1090293 - Copy
Hugo amongst Sea Lavender in Heysham, Lancashire.
FB_IMG_1528737041708.jpg
Hedgehog wandering up a woodland path, Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Dales.
P1090164
Underneath the Umbels, Clitheroe, Lancashire.
P1080230
Red Grouse, Great Stone of Four stones, Bentham, Lancashire.
P1080749
Small Heath Butterfly, Askham Fell, Cumbria.
P1090583
Compass Jellyfish on the beach, North Uist, Outer Hebrides.
P1090669
Common Seal, Isle of Bernerey, Outer Hebrides.
P1080738
Pretty Linnet, Askham Fell, Cumbria.
P1090910
Female Red Deer, North Uist.
P1090917
Blooming Heather on North Uist.
Swallow-tailed Moth, Salthill Nature Reserve in Clitheroe.
p1090074676857938.jpg
Common Spotted Orchids in the Wildflower meadow, Gisburn Forest, Lancashire.
P1090622
One of the Otters we saw on North Uist. πŸ™‚
P1090516
Corn Buntings, North Uist.
P1090275
Sea Holly, Crosby Beach, Merseyside.
P1090136
Painted Lady, Salthill Nature Reserve, Clitheroe.
P1080538
Bugles near Derwentwater, Cumbria.
P1000087
Dipper, Stridd Wood, Bolton Abbey.
P1080746
Skylark with lunch, Askham Fell, Cumbria.

Hope you enjoyed the photos.

What are your own favourite wildlife moments of 2018?

Sunday Sevens 18th November.

It’s a Sunday Sevens Birthday Edition!

I booked a week off work ~ you have to when it’s your birthday don’t you….

Anyway here are a few pictures from my week.

We spent last weekend at a mates Holiday Cottage in Ravenglass, a small seaside village on the Cumbrian coast. We were joined for two nights by some friends as well, and it was great to spend time with them. 😁

The cottage looked out across the Estuary and my God daughters enjoyed looking for ‘treasures’ on the beach. This anchor was a bit big to take home with them though!

The cottage was packed to the rafters with owls! They were everywhere. In the beams, on the walls, on the windows….

img_20181111_151645_2248963498668789018379.jpg

A favourite tipple of mine this week was a Edinburgh Rhubarb & Ginger Gin Liqeur served with Gingerale. πŸ™‚

Birthdays mean books! I received these three as presents and I’m excited to delve into them. πŸ™‚

This week I got to make a chocolate bar and a box of chocolates at The Chocolate Works in Clitheroe. Definitely a scrumptious idea for a Girls Night out. πŸ™‚

And I wasn’t the only one with a Birthday! Hugo’s pal Mick the Greyhound had a 3rd Birthday Party at his humans house. Oh my! If you can imagine five Springer spaniels, two greyhounds, a beautiful collie and a naughty black labrador all running riot ( whilst getting on amazingly well ~ Phew! ) in your home for two hours, you’ve got the picture. πŸ™‚ They were a lot easier to entertain than children anyway. πŸ˜‰ Hugo loved it!

Afterwards I got to party in town with my chums!

Thanks to Natalie at Threads and Bobbins for devising Sunday Sevens.

Hope you had a good week.

Sunday Sevens 14th October.

Today I thought I would round off my week with a Sunday Sevens, seven or more pictures from the last 7 days.

A Witchy Walk.

Even though we are busy decorating the kitchen at the moment ( when I say we, I really mean Wil ! ) , we did take time out for a walk in Aitken Wood near Barley. Pendle Witch country, the little conifer woods here are home to a spooky sculpture trail that tells the story of the Lancashire witch trials of 1612 . I have now reached 1300 miles walked in 2018, so still hoping to complete 1500 by the end of the year.

Guilty Pleasures. 😈

So I’m in love with the devil ! Fantasy horror writer Neil Gaiman is one of the creators of the supernatural characters in Lucifer, a TV series about the original fallen angel, the devil himself. Now residing in LA, Lucifer is keen to learn more about humanity and is even using his devilish powers for good ( well kind of πŸ˜‰ ), working as detective Chloe Decker’s wickedly sexy sidekick. Swoon! I am late to the party as usual…but totally loving this show. ❀️ You can watch it on Amazon Prime.

Witchy Read.

Also very appropriate for this time of year, how about a supernatural romance that begins in Autumn and is set in historical Oxford? Diana Bishop is a young scholar ( and reluctant witch) , who unwitingly stumbles upon an ancient enchanted manuscript, buried deep in Oxford’s Bodleian library. It’s discovery both thrills and disturbs the supernatural community, who all want to get their hands on both it and the young witch who summoned it. Diana finds herself being both hunted and protected by an ancient brooding vampire called Matthew Clairmont. This book has apparently just been made into a fantasy series on Sky, so one to look out for. For now though, I’ll just curl up with this couldron bubbling paperback romance. πŸ•ΈοΈ

Skipper Stew.

The first recipe we tried from The Little Book Of Hygge was a success! We made Skipper Stew which is a winter warming stew, perfect for Autumn and Winter. As its name suggests Skipper Stew was originally made on ships. The main ingredients are brisket ( though any meat will do), chicken stock, onions and potatoes. We served it with sourdough bread and pickled red cabbage instead of the suggested Pickled beets and Rye bread though. You can also find the recipe online here.

Wine Tasting. 🍷

Yesterday I was lucky enough to go to a Wine Tasting in Waddington with some friends. At first we were all very professional , swirling our glasses round and declaring ‘ I detect hints of elderflower’ , but it soon descended into chaos when we realised there were fifty bottles to try, in a two hour time slot. Haha. Great idea! If your thinking about wine now , check out www.winesbytimbyrne.co.uk

So that was my week, how was yours?

A camera and a coffee ~ Clitheroe Castle.

Some of you will know that I happen to live, but a hop, skip and a jump away from a tiny castle keep in a small Lancashire market town. I have been neglecting the grounds of Clitheroe Castle on my blog recently, so yesterday I took my camera and a coffee out and explored for an hour.

The Castle was built in 1186 by Robert de Lacy and rises proudly over the town. Its really only a Norman ruin with no roof, but it’s our roofless ruin. πŸ™‚

Clitheroe Castle. The Ivy flowers on the wall were buzzing with insects.
A Coffee.
Peeping Pigeon.

Below the keep is aΒ  memorial commemorating all those residents of Clitheroe, lost in two World Wars. The soldier stands, head bowed, looking out toward Pendle Hill.

War Memorial.
P1000050
Front view , with the castle in the background.
Museum.

Clitheroe Castle Museum resides in the former Steward’s House in the grounds. Many moons ago I visited with a friend and wrote this post ~ Clitheroe Castle and Museum.

There is also a cafΓ© in the Atrium, which is a good place for a brew.

 

Newish signage for ‘The Pinnacle’
Cheeky Squirrel.

I soon got side tracked by the local wildlife.

Orange Berries of the Firethorn.
Red Admiral.
Turning Oak Leaves.
Female Chaffinch.
Honey Fungus.
The Pinnacle.

The Pinnacle , situated in the Rose garden was once part of the Houses of Parliament and was gifted to the town in 1937. Also in the Rose garden are a couple of sculptures , a leaping limestone salmon and a hawk.

Dive-bombing.
Hugo at the Castle Street Entrance.

That’s all for now though, my hour is up! Maybe I will return soon, with a camera and a coffee . πŸ™‚