Category Archives: Places to visit

Hawthorns November Photo Scavenger Hunt.

I’m joining in as ever with Hawthorns Photo Scavenger Hunt this month. For this one I did look into my archives for a couple of pictures.

❤️

Houseplant/s ~ I have a few cacti and succulents dotted around the house. Heres my favourite planted in a stout can which I got a few years ago from a Makers Market in Manchester. So happy it’s still going strong. 🙂

Ring/s ~ It’s The Singing Ringing Tree over Burnley way. A metal pipe sculpture of a twisted tree. When the wind blows through the pipes ,eerie tunes are played. Hugo was mesmerised on our visit a few years ago. 😅

Harbour ~ Staithes on the Yorkshire coast , a November visit some 5 years ago. A lovely picturesque place to amble round.

Window ~ I love this office window in town, with the town literally stenciled onto the glass. A picture perfect view of Clitheroe.

Sky ~ This was my front passenger seat vista on our journey home from the caravan in October. It felt like we were driving into those puffy white clouds.

My own choice ~ I have noticed quite a few white and black & white crows around Clitheroe recently. No photos yet, but here’s one of a bonnie blackbird with white feathers I have seen too.

Thanks for dropping by.🥰

A Trawden & Wycoller Walk inspired by the Brontes.

Although the literary Bronte family lived in Haworth in Yorkshire, it was not uncommon for the siblings to walk over the Pennine moors to the secluded hamlet of Wycoller

in Lancashire. As Sunday promised some rare dry weather ,we headed to the village of Trawden for a Circular Walk that takes in some of the rugged Pendle countryside that may have inspired their writings.

The ruins of Wycollar Hall.

The walk starts from the Trawden Arms in the village,so we found some roadside parking nearby. We then made our way up some old tram tracks to the right of the pub, crossed a main road and then followed a route through many boggy fields, moorland and woodland. It was very wet under foot, but there was lots to see. We passed several farms and smallholdings around Trawden, home to various pets and livestock.

Trawden Arms Pub.
What Ewe Lookin At? ~ my go to caption for sheep.
Cuddly Llamas.
Collie guard.
The grass is always greener…
Donkey duo.

We followed Trawden Brook up to Lumb Spout , once a popular Victorian beauty spot.

If nothing else, 2020 has been my year for finding Waxcaps.
Not the best photo of Lumb Spout.

The route then follows the Pennine National Bridleway Trail over moorland for a way. I saw a couple of stonechat but didn’t manage to get a photo. The skies were big and the ground was sodden.

Eventually we found outselves off the rugged moors and entering the serene Wycoller Country Park with its greenery, woodland, winding brook and stone bridges.

Stone Clapper Bridge.
A bracket fungi.

Wycoller is a former handloom weaving settlement, the villagers took their cloth to the drying ground above Wycoller Hall. Folk moved away to find jobs after the introduction of the powerloom in Lancashire’s industrial towns.

The Bronte sisters visited Wycoller and it is said that in Charlotte’s novel Jane Eyre , the hall was her inspiration for Ferndean Manor where Mr Rochester lived.

Wycoller Hall.
Wycoller.
Wycoller.

We ate our sandwiches here and set off to continue our walk back to Trawden, totally forgetting to go and see The Atom Panopticon sculpture which is a short stroll away. Oh well, a reason to return!

Wycoller Moggie.
A pulpit style.
Trumpet Lichen.
Pendle Hill view ~ Pendle always seems to sneek into view on our walks.
A farm cottage toward the end of our hike.

All in all this walk was about six miles long, though at quite a slow pace because of all the mud. Unlike the Bronte sisters we didn’t need to wander the soggy terrain in long gowns and petticoats! I wonder if any of the siblings ever did catch a glimpse of Pendle Hill ? It would be nice to think so….

X

Lockdown Birthday.

A lockdown birthday was never going to be the same. Celebration ideas were changed as Lancashire tiers upped levels and then a national lockdown was announced. Finally what I was left with ,still a happy time I think….a few doorstep visits from family & friends, an online party, a walk, yummy food cooked by my other half and a delicious take-away hot chocolate. The new normal isn’t so bad.

Zoom party itinerary and friends portraits of me. More flattering than photos!
A viaduct Sunday morning walk.
Hot chocolate from The Chocolate Works.
Such a lovely book.

A book to dip into everyday of Autumn. Today’s poem probably more appropriate for a frosty November day.

Heres a few verses from The Duke Of Fire and The Duchess Of Ice by Carol Ann Duffy.

Passionate love for the Duke of fire

the Duchess of Ice felt.

One kiss was her heart’s desire,

but with one kiss she would melt.

She dreamed of him in his red pantaloons,

In his orange satin blouse,

In his crimson cravat,

In his tangerine hat,

In his vermilion dancing shoes.

One kiss, one kiss,

Lips of flame on frost,

One kiss, pure bliss,

and never count the cost.

As you can probably imagine, there’s a puddle at the end of this poem….

Thanks for dropping by. ❤️

A Ribchester Ramble.

The weekend saw us head to the Ribble Valley village of Ribchester for a 5.5 circular walk, taking in squelchy fields and country lanes. Ribchester was the site of the Roman fort Bremetennacum and there are ruins of a Roman Bath House in the village. Take your wellies if you do this walk. 😁

An old cottage in Ribchester.
Love this Autumnal wreath.
Corpse Bride.
Pub sign for the White Bull.

We left the village by following the private road to Parsonage farm , where a bridleway took us into waterlogged fields.

Parsonage Farm.
Hugo loved this rainwater pond.
View through the trees.

After squelching through the fields there was some country lane walking. We kept Hugo on his lead, though we didn’t see any cars. Hothersall Lane eventually joins the Ribble Way.

Beef cows at Butchers Fold.
Butchers Fold.
Someone’s watching me…
Look out for those ducks.

Hothersall Lane winds its way down to an Outdoor Centre and then Hothersall Hall. Apparently just past the entrance of Hothersall Hall Farm there is a stone head wedged in a tree. But we couldn’t find it!

Hothersall Lane.
Autumn Leaves.
Hothersall Hall.

We climbed uphill to some trees and there were great views over the Ribble.

Hugo watching us eat sandwiches….
Heading downhill.
Fungi on a tree.
Spot the fieldfare. ❤️

We followed The Ribble Way back to the village. There are lots of interesting old buildings in Ribchester ,so it’s definitely worth a look around.

Fishing on the Ribble.
Love this house gateway.
St Wilfred’s Church, one of four local churches here.
Ribchester Roman Museum.
A column depicting Ribchester’s history.
Potters Barn Cafe is open for takeaways. I can recommend the cake. 🍰
Roman Bath House remains.
Roman Bath House remains.

It was good to visit a village less than ten miles from home, that we have rarely spent any time before.

Find this walk in Guide to Lancashire Pub Walks by Nick Burton.

Walk From Nest On The Hill.

It does feel like all I post about is walking this year. I suppose that is very true! Before this Sunday morning hike from the Nick O Pendle , we also enjoyed a tasty breakfast at the super cute Nest On The Hill , a newly opened little cafe in a cabin at The Wellsprings restaurant. Wil had a sausage butty and I devoured yummy french toast with melted chocolate and blackberry compote. Hugo was made a fuss of by the lovely young couple who run this quirky bruncherie ( hope bruncherie is a word! ), that serves warming food & drinks before the main restaurant opens for lunch. The Nest is also packed with locally sourced gifts and crafts. Lots of present ideas. I even started my Christmas shopping!

After our food and my purchasing , Hugo for one was busting for a walk. I could have curled up on the cosy sofa in front of the toasty log burner for a while longer ,but fresh air beckoned…. We took the owners recommendation of a bridleway walk through the fields, thus avoiding the crowds who park nearby to make their way up Pendle Hill.

Pendle Ski ⛷️ Slope.
Bench with a view.
View information board.

We walked up the road and down a little , then through a gate on the right, following a farm track/ bridleway over rugged Lancashire countryside. To be totally honest I’m not really sure what this area is called, maybe Wiswell Moor. Some map perusing is needed! Anyway we basically walked as far as a field of llamas, then turned around and made our way back. A muddy 4 miles or so.

An old barn.
Rugged terrain.
Windswept tree.
Sheep’s eye view.
Approaching a conifer plantation.

We carried on toward Bramley Farm.
Passing a few houses and farms, some boarded up.
Look! Llamas.
Green fields.
Blue sky.
Looking towards Nick Of Pendle.
Sunbathing sheep.

The weather was bright and breezy, a perfect Pendle day. More from Pendle Hill coming soon hopefully. 🥾

Nest On The Hill. A cozy Pendle Gem.

Garrigill to Ashgill Force walk 🥾🍁

At the weekend we took a walk from Garrigill in the North Pennines to the nearby waterfall of Ashgill Force. We bought an Alston Moor walk leaflet in the outdoors shop in Alston for 60p.

The route begins at Garrigill’s Village Green, we parked near the village church. Garrigill looks to be a lovely little village , whose pub and shop have seen better days.

St John’s Church.
Village Green.
George and Dragon sign.

The leaflet says that there were once two pubs in Garrigill. The George & Dragon was the haunt of visiting gentry, Tories and shooting parties, whilst the Fox was for miners, poachers and Liberals!

Climb the slippy bridleway to Loaning Head.
A Loaning Head cottage.
Views across the Pennines.
Kestrel.
There are lots of very high Stiles to climb over.
Swaledale Sheep.
One moment, blue skies…
the next, sideways rain..
Meadow Cranesbill.

The weather went a bit wild and after navigating about a million steep stiles we came across the waterfall. Unfortunately we had managed to deviate from our maps directions somehow, but we got there in the end.

Gill scramblers at Ashgill Force.
Ashgill Force.

It is apparently possible to walk behind the waterfall, and indeed ‘ Dance with the Fairies’ , although it looked a bit busy with Gill Scramblers the day we visited.

Hugo was joined in the gorge by another Black Labrador boy, which would be lovely if Hugo actually liked other boy labradors. Fortunately Hugo was more interested in the stones Wil were throwing in the water, than fighting. Phew!

Labradors.
Footbridge.

The rest of the walk was more of a gentle meander, following the River South Tyne back to Garrigill.

An almost stone circle.
Another footbridge.
A beautiful place for a dip.
Fly Agarics beside the river.
Autumn colours.
Buzzard.
A mini waterfall.
Attractive stone bridge.
Hips.
And back to the church.

I really enjoyed this scenic 5 mile walk and hopefully we will try it out again, maybe when the meadows are full of wildflowers come early Summer. 🙂

A Wander To Waddington.

Sunday was a sunny day surprise, so a walk from home beckoned. The suggestion of a wander to the nearby village of Waddington …and lunch, was an attractive proposition. We set off late morning, passing through the grounds of Clitheroe Castle, by the River Ribble and then along the road to our destination.

Clitheroe Castle ~ the second smallest castle keep in the country.
Trinity Church, built in 1887.
A track down Back Commons.
Stone steps down to the river.
Waddow Hall on the opposite side of the Ribble. The Hall is used by Girl Guiding UK.
A white washed cottage surrounded by cows.
Brungerley Bridge and a high river.
Heading into Waddington.

Apparently Waddington is named after its founder, an 8th century Anglo-Saxon chieftain called Wadda. This pretty village has probably won the accolade of Lancashire’s Best Kept Village, more than any other. The picturesque coronation gardens might have something to do with it.

Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.
Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.
War Memorial Cross.
Village centre.
St Helens Church, a focal point of the village.

There are three pubs in the village, my personal favourite being The Lower Buck, which is a friendly welcoming independent watering hole. Does delicious pub grub too, so a perfect place for lunch. It was warm enough to sit outside in the sunshine.

Lower Buck looking pretty in the Autumn sun.
Love the pub sign.
A nice surprise inside, the pub pup. ❤️
Lunch time.
And someone is watching us eat.

After dinner we headed home via the country lane to Low Moor and back into Clitheroe.

Grey Heron.
Blue sky and Pendle Hill in the very distance.
One of two stags that adorn the entrance to a farm.
The bridge to Low Moor on the outskirts of Clitheroe.

Did you enjoy a sunny Sunday?

Bowscale Tarn. 🦈

Saturday morning was chilly and bright as we parked in the small parking area in the little hamlet of Bowscale. Our mission was to find a hidden mountain tarn, once popular as a Victorian tourist destination. Well heeled holiday makers would be transported on ponies up the bridleway from Bowscale to enjoy the views. Today the path remains and a few people ( and dogs 🙂 ) still hike to the tarn.

The walk up to Bowscale Tarn is clearly defined and a relatively gentle climb. Just as I was believing the water would never appear ( I’m very impatient! ) , there it was.

Bowscale Tarn is a corrie tarn, a lake formed when a glacier melted and eroded a bowl shape into the mountains. My photos don’t really do the shape of the tarn justice.

Hugo had a good swim. He is in great company with lots of human wild swimmers who have enjoyed taking a dip here. Check out Christine’s blog for her Bowscale Tarn experience. 🙂

Legend has it that the icy waters are home to two immortal fish! Wordsworth mentioned them in his poem Song, at the feast of Brougham Castle, though not sure how the fishy tale started.

There are plentiful Wainwright fells to attempt in the area, so I’m sure we will return. Above is Carrock Fell ,which we could see on our right ,as we walked up to the tarn.

🥾 3-5 mile walk from Bowscale.

Hawthorns Photo Scavenger Hunt ~ September.

Hi it’s Scavenger Hunt time again. I am linking up with Kate’s Blog and choosing a photo for each prompt.



Seasonal. At the beginning of the month we had a walk around RSPB Campfield Marsh near Bowness on Solway. It looked particularly lovely with the late summer seasonal heather in bloom.


Favourite seat/place to sit. I haven’t really got a favourite, but if I had, how about a pew with a view. This was taken 2 years ago on Berneray in the Outer Hebrides. Oh to be back!
Comforting/cosy. Speaking of seats, a lovely friend made me a cushion over lockdown. It’s perfect as an armrest on my bench in the back yard.
Delight/ed/ful. I was delighted to capture this delightful Red Admiral on camera a few days ago. Now it’s September butterflies are becoming fewer and far between.
Micro/mini/tiny. These Shetland ponies might be small, but they are feisty characters. Hugo is keeping his distance. 😅


My own choice. Slinky hasn’t made an appearance on the blog in a while. Never fear she is still here. Here she is hogging Hugo’s bed. Luckily he has two!

Thanks for dropping by.

Lowther Longhorns.

Just a quick and hopefully cute post for you today, featuring some very laid back longhorns. I’ve had a fair few hair raising run ins with coos this year, there have been some frisky heifers and bullish young bulls on summer walks, I can tell you. But these guys, well they are just in full on relaxed mode. Though maybe a little curious about why I’m peering at them from behind a big tree…..

Luckily on my second attempt at capturing this native cattle breed on camera, I got slightly better photos. My first attempt a few weeks earlier was on my camera phone. I quite like that you can see lovely Lowther Castle on these ones though. 😊

The English Longhorns roam freely on the Lowther Castle estate near Penrith in Cumbria. They are a new introduction at the castle, and another introduction may well be on its way. Back in January the Lowther estate was given the go ahead to reintroduce beavers to the river Lowther. Due to coronavirus this has been put on hold at the moment though.

I was quite happy to see these snoozy beasts anyway. English Longhorns are a hardy breed , they will be able to stay outdoors during the cold winter months. I am looking forward to seeing more of them through the seasons. 🐮