Tag Archives: Chatburn

Weekend Wanderings. πŸ₯Ύ

Well it’s been another weekend of walks and wanders. I can’t promise any different blog content really , Im not the crafty or cooking sort and I’ve really slowed down on my reading. Definitely looking forward to a change of scenery, whilst still appreciating how lucky I am to have so many local walks on my doorstep. The grass is always greener hey….

There are a couple of good walks groups on Facebook that I have been following over lockdown. Both have been quite informative and inspiring when it comes to planning where to go.

  • Lancashire Walks With Frank & Lee.
  • Ribble Valley Walking Forum.
Fairy Bridge over Swanside Beck.

One route I found via the forum was a circular walk that can either be started in Sawley or Chatburn. It takes in an old packhorse bridge and the ruins of Sawley Abbey. The Fairy Bridge was so cute. What a beauty. 😊

Hugo takes on the Fairy Bridge.
Pink primrose.
Fresh new garlic leaves.
Sawley Abbey.

A popular Clitheroe walk takes in Brungerley park with the Ribble Valley Sculpture Trail at its heart. Recently some of the art works have had a well needed spruce up and a local community group ‘ The Hawthorn Placers’ have been brightening the walk further with colourful painted slabs. ❀️

Brungerley Park.
Newly cleaned Otter sculpture.
An explosion of White Butterburs.
Kingfisher sculpture.

There are lots of painted slabs to find. Should keep the kids busy in the Easter Holidays. πŸ™‚

Colourful art depicting April Fools Day.
And Easter.

I have started tracking our walks on a free walking app called Relive. It makes handy little map videos of your hikes.

Relive App.

Hope you’ve had a good weekend. 😊

Downham Walk. πŸ‘

One of Clitheroe’s neighboring villages is Chatburn and from there it’s a pleasant walk into Downham, a picture postcard village used as filming locations in various TV programmes and also in the classic film ‘ Whistle Down The Wind’. Sunday was bitterly cold, so we chose this walk as there are two brew stops, if so desired..

Christ Church, Chatburn. We started the walk from here.

There is a recentish opened enclosed roadside path to Downham. It makes the walk there so much safer.

It passes Greendale , open for takeways again as of the weekend.

Cute sheep. πŸ™‚

Instead of carrying on to Downham we took a detour to Downham Mill, which is down a track on the right,off the road to Rimington. In the past like nearby Twiston Mill , it was a medieval water powered cornmill. Both mills are no longer mills, but do have ponds and millstones.

Downham Mill.

Old Millstone.

It is possible to walk past Downham Mill and over the fields to Twiston. Instead we took a footpath on the right before the mill, which lead us over some hilly fields to the village of Downham.

Hugo having a mad do.

Star on waymarker.

Jelly Ear Fungi.

Pendle Hill with snow covering blends into the white sky.

Downham brook.

The ice-cream shop on Hare Green.

Open for brews, cake, sandwiches….and ice-cream. Brrrrrrrrr!

Sheep doing lunch.

The toilets in the car park were actually open. Yay!

Downham dwellings.

Up at St Leonard’s Church in the village there are nice views of Pendle Hill, still blending into the sky.

Sun dial in the churchyard.

Cemetery snowdrops.

Pendle from the porch.

The Assheton Arms from the churchyard.

Hide and seek sheep.

We walked back to Chatburn , passing this unusual breed of sheep again. Anyone know what they are?

Thanks for dropping by..

On The Riverside.

Today was one of those days when I really wish I had taken my camera out with me, instead of just my phone. This frosty walk along the river from home to the village of Chatburn gave lots of photographic opportunities of the feathered variety. I counted Grey Herons, Little Egrets, Canada Geese, Moorhens, Kestrel, Goosanders and Wagtails .

We don’t often walk on the left hand side of the Ribble on this route for some reason, so it was nice to see the surrounding countryside from a different perspective. Clitheroe’s industrial landscape appeared sporadically in the distance.

Mute Swan.

Mary Horner’s attractive carved bench was particularly striking. Was she a shepherdess I wonder….

Alder catkins.

A type of polypore fungi.

After a brew and sausage roll in the village of Chatburn we chose to walk back home on the road, though another great way to get back to Clitheroe is of course along the other side of the river.

Thanks for joining me on a Winter’s day stroll.