Tag Archives: common seals

Wildlife Moments in 2018.

Its December everyone! Is it to early to do a bit of a round-up post?? 2018 has been a pretty good year for spotting wildlife I’ve never seen before. I glimpsed my first Gannets plunging into the ocean for fish off Skye, my first Stonechats darting between fence posts and gorse bushes in Ravenglass and my first Great Crested Grebes fishing in the lagoon at Hodbarrow Nature Reserve. I witnessed my first Eider Ducks bobbing along an aquamarine blue sea in the Outer Hebrides and watched for the first time, wild otters swimming and playing in a sheltered cove there.

And this year I have tried to identify and record every flower, mammal, bird, butterfly and moth I have come across whilst out and about , in a Nature Diary. Doing this has definitely got me busy looking up everything in my often neglected wildlife guides. My diary has gotten quite full, though I know there are still so many plants and animals, that I haven’t had the pleasure of viewing in our beautiful British Isles.

Here are just a few photos of some of the wildlife I have managed to capture on camera this year. πŸ™‚

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Great Crested Grebe fishing whilst sporting winter plumage ~ Hodbarrow Nature Reserve, Haverigg, Cumbria.
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Hugo amongst Sea Lavender in Heysham, Lancashire.
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Hedgehog wandering up a woodland path, Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Dales.
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Underneath the Umbels, Clitheroe, Lancashire.
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Red Grouse, Great Stone of Four stones, Bentham, Lancashire.
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Small Heath Butterfly, Askham Fell, Cumbria.
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Compass Jellyfish on the beach, North Uist, Outer Hebrides.
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Common Seal, Isle of Bernerey, Outer Hebrides.
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Pretty Linnet, Askham Fell, Cumbria.
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Female Red Deer, North Uist.
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Blooming Heather on North Uist.
Swallow-tailed Moth, Salthill Nature Reserve in Clitheroe.
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Common Spotted Orchids in the Wildflower meadow, Gisburn Forest, Lancashire.
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One of the Otters we saw on North Uist. πŸ™‚
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Corn Buntings, North Uist.
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Sea Holly, Crosby Beach, Merseyside.
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Painted Lady, Salthill Nature Reserve, Clitheroe.
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Bugles near Derwentwater, Cumbria.
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Dipper, Stridd Wood, Bolton Abbey.
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Skylark with lunch, Askham Fell, Cumbria.

Hope you enjoyed the photos.

What are your own favourite wildlife moments of 2018?

Hawthorn’s Photo Scavenger Hunt ~ August.

I feel like I haven’t had my blogging head on for ages! But never fear, I am back. And feeling refreshed, from a lovely twelve night break on the West coast of Scotland. I thought I would ease back into the blogosphere by joining in with Hawthorn/Kate’s Photo Scavenger Hunt. This month she has chosen words that are homophones. That is, two or more words having the same pronunciation but different meanings, origins or spellings. I thought I would look through my recent holiday pictures…and hope for the best. πŸ™‚

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Tea/Tee. So I chose tea…as in a pudding we had for our tea, one evening in a cosy cabin in Slockavullin. Slockavullin might sound Scandinavian, but it is in fact a little village in Kilmartin Glen, Argyll. The cabin was set in a small orchard in the owners garden and as the trees were laden with apples and plums, what better idea than to make a crumble….And very tasty it was too. πŸ™‚

Thyme/ Time. How’s this photo for bath time? Our Slockavullin cabin had its very own outdoor bath tub. I never did try out alfresco bath time, much to my lasting regret. My only excuse being, our time in Kilmartin Glen was short and quite drizzly and chilly. If you like the look of this cabin, look for ‘peaceful cabin in Kilmartin Glen’ on airbnb !

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Aisle/ Isle. Most of our break away was actually spent in the Outer Hebrides on the Isle of North Uist, which is connected to Berneray in the North and Benbecula, South Uist and Eriskay in the South, by short causeway roads. To get to the Uists , we travelled to the Isle of Skye and then caught a ferry from Uig on Skye to Lochmaddy in North Uist. I absolutely loved my time there. The stunning white sandy beaches, turquoise sea and amazing wildlife, its all true. And definitely worth the journey!

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Fairy/Ferry. Whilst on Skye, we didn’t get that much chance to explore, as our short time there were basically stopovers, on the way to and from North Uist. We did however visit Fairy Glen, a strange other-worldly landscape in the hills above Uig. Grassy knolls, tiny lochans, and even a fairylike rock castle, all made for an enchanting diversion.

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Flour/Flower. Ah the wildflowers. There were so many of them adorning the Scottish Countryside, especially on the islands. The Outer Hebrides are known for their fertile low lying grassy plains called Machair, which in the Summer months are a riot of colour. I think these cornflower blue blooms are devils-bit Scabious.

My Own Choice. I shall return with posts about our trip to The Outer Hebrides and also our time in Kilmartin Glen. Let me leave you with a bench with a view! This viewing point on the island of Berneray is perfect for watching a colony of common seals. We spent quite a while there before taking Hugo for a run on the stunning white sands, further along the coast. πŸ™‚

Please check out Hawthorn’s Scavenger Hunt for more scavenger hunt posts tommorrow.

Seals at Blakeney Point.

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The National Trust Building at Morston Quay.

One of the things I  looked forward to on our trip to North Norfolk, was a boat trip I had booked, to see the seals at Blakeney Point. Blakeney has the largest seal colony in England.  There are hundreds of  these inquisitive mammals, either bobbing in the water or basking on the point.  As the best way to view them is on a specially organized boat trip, we chose Temples ,who are based at nearby Morston. Typically the day that we had chosen ended up incredibly windy!  But phew, we were able to reschedule for the following day, the last of our holiday. πŸ™‚

After collecting our tickets from The Anchor pub, we were directed to the Quay and boarded ‘The Four Sisters’, one of  Temple’s red and white purpose built boats.

 

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It wasn’t too long before we saw our first seals. There are both Grey and Common Seals at Blakeney Point. Common Seals arrive here in the summer to have their pups , whilst the Greys tend to give birth in November and December.

 

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The boat got up pretty close to the seals, but they didn’t seem to bothered by our clicking cameras.  How beautiful are they! Of course we didn’t outstay our welcome and the skipper turned the boat, to view more groups relaxing in the shallows.

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The Lifeboat House.
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A Grey Seal hanging out with the commoners. πŸ˜‰

 

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The trip includes a stop off at the point if you wish, where you can walk up to the Old Lighthouse building and watch the various seabirds that nest there.  The boat’s crew pointed out Sandwich, Common, Little and Arctic Terns flying above us.

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Of course me being me, I was just as excited at meeting some particular members of the crew! Three generations of the same  labrador family were on hand for strokes and to snuffle for spare biscuits. Meet Tide, Bella and Gillie. πŸ™‚

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The boat trip with Temple’s was certainly a fun and informative outing. Seabirds, Seals and a canine crew. What more do you need. πŸ™‚

Prices. Β£12 per adult. Β£6 per child. Dogs free ( keep on a lead). Tel.01263740791.