Tag Archives: dog walks

Keswick Railway Walk. ๐Ÿฅพ

On Saturday after some shopping and lunch in Keswick we decided to walk the Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path. It’s been a few years since we’ve done this. In fact the trail was almost all destroyed by Storm Desmond in 2015. Happily this mostly flat hike that follows the route of the old Keswick to Penrith Railway Line has been completely restored. It’s a popular link-up between Keswick and the nearby village of Threlkeld and is suitable for cycling, walking, prams and wheel chairs. A great route for all. โ˜บ๏ธ

The Market Town of Keswick.
Lunch at Jaspers ~ a lovely pooch friendly cafe.
River Greta, Fitz Park, Keswick.

The Railway Walk starts from the old Railway Station which is now part of the Keswick Country House Hotel. There is parking close by behind the Swimming Pool ,which sadly looks to have closed.

Beginning of walk from Keswick.
Keswick Old Railway Station.
Decorative Waymarker.

There have been plenty of changes to the trail in the restoration including the reopening of the Bobbin Mill Railway Tunnel which had been buried for fourty years!

Bobbin Mill Tunnel.
Bobbin Mill Tunnel.

Pews with Views have been placed along the route , looking out over the fast flowing River Greta and surrounding fells.

A Pew With A View.
Pods at Low Briery Holiday Park.
Crossing the River Greta.
Trees almost forming their own tunnel.
Perched.

Storm Desmond had whipped away two bridges and most of the pathway back in 2015. The tarmacked road and new storm strengthened bridges are brilliant improvements though.

Bowstring Bridge.
Several Interpretation Boards can be found along the trail.
I Spy an Ice cream Van.
The River Greta’s name comes from the Norse word for stony stream.
Frog Spawn.
Victorian Fence Post.
Another tunnel.
Hugo on the trail.

The path is 5km from Keswick to Threlkeld and 5km back. Threlkeld is a pretty mountainside village with two pubs and a coffee shop.

Threlkeld.
Threlkeld.
Blencathra?
Threlkeld Coffee Shop.

After a coffee we decided to cheat a bit and hopped on the bus back into town. Fortuitously we only had a two minute wait.

We then had enough time to take Hugo down to Derwent Water for a paddle. โ˜บ๏ธ

Have you ever walked the Keswick to Threlkeld Railway Path?

Tockholes Walk. ๐Ÿฅพ

Hi there, hope everyone has had a good Christmas break. On Boxing Day, despite it being a bit drizzly and damp, we were up for a good walk to blow away the cobwebs. Out came the Guide To Lancashire Pub Walks by Nick Burton. We decided to try the last route in this handy little pocket size book, taking in moorland and woodland near the West Pennines village of Tockholes. I am sure parts of this trek have been covered by other bloggers I follow, but it is an area myself and Wil definitely need to explore more.

We parked near The Royal Arms pub, which looks to be a popular ramblers Inn with toasty fires , serves food and is dog friendly. In no time we were walking up Darwen Moor, heading into the mist.

Darwen Moor and a sign for its popular landmark, not a rocket ๐Ÿš€ but Darwen Tower.
Moorland horse.
On the move.
And so are we, in the opposite direction.
Back onto moorland by Stepback Brook.
We didn’t head for the tower, which at the moment is obscured by scaffolding anyway, but followed the signs across the fell and back down toward woodland.
Zig Zagging across the Moors, we heard Grouse calling to one another.
Once in Roddlesworth Woods saw lots of Winter Fungi.
Witches Butter Fungi aka Yellow Brain.
Turkey Tail Fungi in the Moss.
In the Woods, the rather spooky remains of Hollinshead Hall, including this old Well House, where pilgrims stopped on the way to Whalley Abbey.
This lovely Pack Horse Bridge was perfect for a pit stop.
A view from the bridge over Rocky Brook.
Tockholes Tourists.
Some kind person had spread bird seed along the opposite bridge wall. Coal Tits, Nuthatch and even Grey Wagtail ( above) were enjoying their Christmas feast.
Nuthatch.
Hugo found an Orange ball which he decided to roll down every little hill he came across.
He also had fun in Rocky Brook.
Pixie Cup Lichen.
We followed the woodland path as far as Roddlesworth Reservoir.
And then turned back on ourselves and found a wooded path back up to The Royal Arms.

This was a good 4 -5 mile walk and I’m hopeful we will make it back to the area soon. Loved all the wildlife seen and the rugged Lancashire landscape.

The Centre Of Britain. ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง

If you were to ever visit the Northumberland town of Haltwhistle and didn’t already know of it’s proud claim to be ‘ the centre of Britain ‘ you would no doubt very soon find out. For this quirky market town has a Centre Of Britain Sweet shop, a Centre of Britain launderette, a Centre of Britain Army Surplus store and a Centre of Britain Hotel, to name but a few of the local businesses. Strolling down the high street here , we definitely felt like we were in the middle of the kingdom! However , coming from a little further South in Lancashire, I know that the true centre of Britain lies 71 miles away near the Trough Of Bowland village of Dunsop Bridge. ๐Ÿ˜€

Haltwhistle certainly knows how to advertise it’s central position , much more so than our understated Dunsop. To really confuse matters though, there are also several other places that like to call themselves ‘ In the middle’ and you can read about them all here. https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/newsroom/blog/where-is-the-centre-of-great-britain-2 Such a controversial topic. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Our visit to the town coincided with rumbling tummies, we found the perfect pit stop in the cobbled market square. Brew Bar is definitely the place to go for coffee, brunch and people watching. It looks like a cracking little night time venue too.

Hopefully we will be back to explore Haltwhistle further. The area is rooted in Hadrian’s Wall country, there are several Roman forts to visit and the town is ideally located for finding them.

For now though, here are some photos of our gentle amble alongside Haltwhistle Burn which is a well signposted waterside walk through Burn Gauge , packed full of wildlife and signs of the town’s industrial heritage. The path that runs aside the beck was once a narrow gauge steam railway.

Dipper.
Wood Cranes – Bill.

The path eventually opens out onto a limestone meadow, before heading onwards towards Hadrian’s Wall, which I am sure we will add onto a future walk.

A species of Marsh Orchid.
Mother of Thyme.
Yellow poppies.
Orange Poppies.
Columbine.

Have you ever visited one of Britain’s Centres of the kingdom?

Bolton- by- Bowland walk. ๐Ÿฅพ

The Coach & Horses pub.

It looks as though for a little while longer, local walks are on the cards. Actually I don’t mind too much, we have been discovering more of our beautiful Ribble Valley by way of  dusty walking books, barely ever glanced through before.

The following images are from a route found in a Walks Around Clitheroe publication by Terry Marsh ~ Walk 8 ~ Bolton-by-Bowland.

Bolton-by-Bowland itself is a charmingly pretty village boasting two village greens, a lovely looking pub with a pumpkin coach sign and an attractive church.

Along the surfaced drive of Bolton Park.
Sheep in the parkland. Nearby Bolton Hall was  the ancestral  home of  Sir Ralph Pudsay ,who had 25 children. ๐Ÿ˜ฏ
Not a captivating photo, but tumbling lapwings ducked and dived over this waterlogged field.
Footbridge over Skirden Beck.
Young bulls after Hague Farm.
Pendle Hill in the distance.
After Rodhill Gate Farm, an ancient highway ascends for some distance.
We are basically walking up a stream. ๐Ÿ˜†
A fallen tree provides the perfect rest stop.
Wil waiting for me as usual.
Still heading up the gully.
Wil waiting for me as usual. ๐Ÿ˜
Just after this photo, Hugo disturbed a hare in the grass. Not that he tried to chase it. Hugo prefers smelly dead things. Yuck!
We did get lost a bit, then found our way eventually.

Priest Biggins Farm. A do er upper!
Grey Alder Catkins.
Tree Lichen.
I like this sign. There was also a deer statue in the farm yard. Sika Deer live in the area.
Approaching the hamlet of Holden.
Spring colour ~ Crocuses. ๐Ÿ™‚
Holden Beck.
We walk along the road a short while, heading back to Bolton by Bowland.
Glorious yellow Winter Aconites.
St Peter & St Paul church.
Stocks on the village green.
A Yew Tree Cottage, with a giant yew tree.
Map of our walk.

I think we will return to Bolton by Bowland , I suspect there is alot more to discover. ๐Ÿฅพ๐Ÿ‘โค๏ธ

Downham Walk. ๐Ÿ‘

One of Clitheroe’s neighboring villages is Chatburn and from there it’s a pleasant walk into Downham, a picture postcard village used as filming locations in various TV programmes and also in the classic film ‘ Whistle Down The Wind’. Sunday was bitterly cold, so we chose this walk as there are two brew stops, if so desired..

Christ Church, Chatburn. We started the walk from here.

There is a recentish opened enclosed roadside path to Downham. It makes the walk there so much safer.

It passes Greendale , open for takeways again as of the weekend.

Cute sheep. ๐Ÿ™‚

Instead of carrying on to Downham we took a detour to Downham Mill, which is down a track on the right,off the road to Rimington. In the past like nearby Twiston Mill , it was a medieval water powered cornmill. Both mills are no longer mills, but do have ponds and millstones.

Downham Mill.

Old Millstone.

It is possible to walk past Downham Mill and over the fields to Twiston. Instead we took a footpath on the right before the mill, which lead us over some hilly fields to the village of Downham.

Hugo having a mad do.

Star on waymarker.

Jelly Ear Fungi.

Pendle Hill with snow covering blends into the white sky.

Downham brook.

The ice-cream shop on Hare Green.

Open for brews, cake, sandwiches….and ice-cream. Brrrrrrrrr!

Sheep doing lunch.

The toilets in the car park were actually open. Yay!

Downham dwellings.

Up at St Leonard’s Church in the village there are nice views of Pendle Hill, still blending into the sky.

Sun dial in the churchyard.

Cemetery snowdrops.

Pendle from the porch.

The Assheton Arms from the churchyard.

Hide and seek sheep.

We walked back to Chatburn , passing this unusual breed of sheep again. Anyone know what they are?

Thanks for dropping by..

On The Riverside.

Today was one of those days when I really wish I had taken my camera out with me, instead of just my phone. This frosty walk along the river from home to the village of Chatburn gave lots of photographic opportunities of the feathered variety. I counted Grey Herons, Little Egrets, Canada Geese, Moorhens, Kestrel, Goosanders and Wagtails .

We don’t often walk on the left hand side of the Ribble on this route for some reason, so it was nice to see the surrounding countryside from a different perspective. Clitheroe’s industrial landscape appeared sporadically in the distance.

Mute Swan.

Mary Horner’s attractive carved bench was particularly striking. Was she a shepherdess I wonder….

Alder catkins.

A type of polypore fungi.

After a brew and sausage roll in the village of Chatburn we chose to walk back home on the road, though another great way to get back to Clitheroe is of course along the other side of the river.

Thanks for joining me on a Winter’s day stroll.

Sabden and Churn Clough Reservoir.

More and more this year, we have discovered places local to us that we haven’t really taken notice of before. One such village is Sabden , just over the other side of Pendle . Nestled in its own valley under the bulk of Lancashire’s most famous hill, Sabden is said to be 2 degrees cooler than any of its neighbors. With that in mind we dressed for Winter on Saturdays 3.5 mile hike from Sabden to Churn Clough Reservoir. We parked at the village car park, where we met a friend and his two Bedlingtons who joined us.

Basically this walk can be made much shorter by not even venturing into Sabden, there is roadside parking before you descend into the village. Personally I am glad we saw at least a small part of Sabden. Or you can include the reservoir in a much longer hike around the valley. Here are some photos from our walk.

Badger Wells Cottages.

Not sure what this flower is, but love it’s vibrant purple colour.

There was a little terrier watching us from the downstairs right window in this pretty cottage.

A striking sunflower bench. No time to rest though..

I love that Gorse can flower all year round.

Finger Post Sign.

We did somehow take a bit of a detour up the hill a bit ( not my idea ๐Ÿคฃ) , so the reservoir materialised quite a distance away. Churn Clough Reservoir was built in the late 1800s and extended in the 1920s. It is used for fishing and there is a good footpath round it.

Churn Clough Reservoir.

Melting snow.

Pew with a view.

Several cormerants were diving for fish.

A rather nice house that looks over the water.

Unfortunately this walkway was blocked off.

Churn Clough dam.

Goodbye Churn Clough.

A typical Sabden cottage.

And an appropriate pub sign for a Pendleside village.

Knitted Nativity. โค๏ธ

I am looking forward to returning to Sabden and it’s scenically set reservoir. Another local gem found.

What has been your favourite local discovery this year? There have been so many…..

Clitheroe to Mitton Circular Walk.

Just a quick post featuring a walk today from home. We set out about 8 am hoping to miss the heat, it was already getting warm early on. Luckily for Hugo this is another route taking in the river Ribble ,so he had plenty of opportunities for paddles and swims.

Today’s walk is a circular route from Clitheroe to Mitton and back. It’s one we have walked a few times over the years.

Heading for the railway bridge.

Mearley Brook.

Approaching the Ribble Way.

There’s a newish photography aid down Edisford.

Edisford Bridge.

Quackers.

We have now crossed the bridge and are walking along the other side of the river towards Mitton. We pass through a little wood.

And carry on down the riverside.

Mama and brood.

Up through another little wood and we find this newly carved bear chair, which has appeared during lockdown.

We follow the footpath signs to Mitton, passing Great Mitton Hall.

Over the bridge near the Aspinall Arms.

The Aspinall arms is somewhere we would ordinarily stop off at for refreshment. Huge beer garden and dog friendly.

Next to the pub footpaths can be followed back to Clitheroe.

I heard a piping call. It belonged to a Common Sandpiper.

Nearly home and more content cattle relaxing in the sun. ๐Ÿ™‚

Have you got out and about this weekend?

Caton Riverside Walk.

Today dawned sunny and warm , we got up pretty early, setting off from Clitheroe at 8am and driving through the beautiful Trough of Bowland and on to Caton , a village by the river Lune. Tantilising glimpses of sparkling blue sea could be viewed as we passed Jubilee Tower. We were however intent on a riverside walk.

At Caton we parked at the Bull Beck picnic site and car park. After crossing the road we joined an old railway walk/cycle path ( now part of the River Lune Millennium Park) and then ambled back along the river, about 4 miles in total.

Stone eisel depicting Railway walk/ cycleway.

Blue Sky.

Bug B & B ( open for business, I presume).

Squirrel checking out prospective breakfasts..

There was already a breakfast guest. ๐Ÿ˜˜

I was so happy to see this gorgeous bullfinch…..and he posed for pictures. ๐Ÿ™‚

Otter carving near the Crook O’ Lune picnic site..

And another. โค๏ธ

Bridge at Crook O’ Lune.

Crook O’ Lune.

Reflections.

Ducklings.

Shallow Weir.

Riverside hide.

Relaxing by the Lune.

Spot the tiny Hugo.

Aquaduct.

There were several of these stone fence posts in the field.

Footbridge over Artle brook.

Hundreds of Sand Martins nest in the sandy river bank. They dart around so fast. I couldn’t believe it when one landed on a nearby fence. ๐Ÿ™‚

Beautiful Sand Martin. ๐Ÿ˜˜

Can just make out the flat top of Ingleborough in the distance.

Another hide.

Oyster catcher on shingle.

Hugo on shingle.

Following the river.

Young bull. Earlier we almost got stampeded by a group of cattle when a farmer was herding them to this field in his tractor. Don’t think he saw us ( hoping not) and we escaped just in time. Yikes!

Young bulls. All much calmer when not being chased by a cross farmer.

No more photos but we are almost back at the car park/ picnic site at Bull Beck. Amazingly the public toilets are actually open. Result!

After brunch ( it’s still only 10-45) we decide to head home through the Trough of Bowland. I had found another walk that looked nice at Abbeystead, but when we arrived it had gotten busy. Everyone else had the same idea! Another time perhaps.

We really enjoyed our River Lune walk. Such a tranquil beautiful morning. โค๏ธ๐Ÿฅพ

Walk Book ~ Walking in the Forest of Bowland and Pendle by Terry Marsh.

Map ~ Explorer OL41 ( Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale).

Higham Circular Walk ~ The Sabden Valley.

I hope to bring you a few more photos from Lancashire walks whilst lockdown continues. ๐ŸŒน

Higham nestles at the foot of Pendle Hill and the Pendle Way is a walking route which can be accessed from the village. The area has many associations with the Pendle Witches. Higham was home to several reputed victims of ‘ the witch ‘ Chattox. She allegedly turned the ale sour in the village pub ‘ The Four All’s Inn ‘ and bewitched the landlords son to death. She along with eight other people were hung on a hill above Lancaster for witchcraft in 1612.

On a more cheery note Higham was also the birthplace of Jonas Moore, who became known as ‘ The Father Of Time’ owing to his key role in establishing Greenwich Mean Time and the Greenwich Meridian. Not bad going for a Lancashire lad…

This walk is a 5.5 mile hike through a gorse strewn valley with lots of views of Pendle , old cobbled tracks and skies full of tumbling swift’s and swallows on a Sunday morning in May.

A Pendle Way sign above Higham.

Golden gorse.

Pendle Hill from above Higham.

Old wall.

Friendly horses, one in a rather posh cerice jacket. ๐Ÿ™‚

A lovely Dapple Grey who wouldn’t pose for a photo.

A beautiful Grade ll listed cottage with mullioned windows..

Geese. ๐Ÿ™‚

One was obviously a Guard Goose.

Unusual carvings.

At another farm ~ a gorgeous guinea fowl..

And a friendly mog.

Onwards along a cobbled track.

Footpath sign.

Looking back towards Pendle.

Climbing a small hill and admiring Pendle, or stopping to catch my breath. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Sheep & lamb.

Over the top of the hill..

Time for a snack.

Heading back to the village.

Wall Brown ๐Ÿฆ‹

The Four Alls Inn.

The Four Alls on the pub sign denote the following.

The King rules all.
The Priest prays for all.
The Soldier fights for all.
The Common Man pays for all.

I was really surprised by this walk. Lots of history and gorgeous scenery in what was once royal hunting ground ‘ The Forest Of Pendle’ . The area is actually now an AONB and deservedly so I think.

X

Walking Book – Guide To Lancashire Pub Walks by Nick Burton.

Map – OS Explorer OL21 South Pennines.

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