Tag Archives: dog walks

Bolton- by- Bowland walk. πŸ₯Ύ

The Coach & Horses pub.

It looks as though for a little while longer, local walks are on the cards. Actually I don’t mind too much, we have been discovering more of our beautiful Ribble Valley by way of  dusty walking books, barely ever glanced through before.

The following images are from a route found in a Walks Around Clitheroe publication by Terry Marsh ~ Walk 8 ~ Bolton-by-Bowland.

Bolton-by-Bowland itself is a charmingly pretty village boasting two village greens, a lovely looking pub with a pumpkin coach sign and an attractive church.

Along the surfaced drive of Bolton Park.
Sheep in the parkland. Nearby Bolton Hall was  the ancestral  home of  Sir Ralph Pudsay ,who had 25 children. 😯
Not a captivating photo, but tumbling lapwings ducked and dived over this waterlogged field.
Footbridge over Skirden Beck.
Young bulls after Hague Farm.
Pendle Hill in the distance.
After Rodhill Gate Farm, an ancient highway ascends for some distance.
We are basically walking up a stream. πŸ˜†
A fallen tree provides the perfect rest stop.
Wil waiting for me as usual.
Still heading up the gully.
Wil waiting for me as usual. 😁
Just after this photo, Hugo disturbed a hare in the grass. Not that he tried to chase it. Hugo prefers smelly dead things. Yuck!
We did get lost a bit, then found our way eventually.

Priest Biggins Farm. A do er upper!
Grey Alder Catkins.
Tree Lichen.
I like this sign. There was also a deer statue in the farm yard. Sika Deer live in the area.
Approaching the hamlet of Holden.
Spring colour ~ Crocuses. πŸ™‚
Holden Beck.
We walk along the road a short while, heading back to Bolton by Bowland.
Glorious yellow Winter Aconites.
St Peter & St Paul church.
Stocks on the village green.
A Yew Tree Cottage, with a giant yew tree.
Map of our walk.

I think we will return to Bolton by Bowland , I suspect there is alot more to discover. πŸ₯ΎπŸ‘❀️

Downham Walk. πŸ‘

One of Clitheroe’s neighboring villages is Chatburn and from there it’s a pleasant walk into Downham, a picture postcard village used as filming locations in various TV programmes and also in the classic film ‘ Whistle Down The Wind’. Sunday was bitterly cold, so we chose this walk as there are two brew stops, if so desired..

Christ Church, Chatburn. We started the walk from here.

There is a recentish opened enclosed roadside path to Downham. It makes the walk there so much safer.

It passes Greendale , open for takeways again as of the weekend.

Cute sheep. πŸ™‚

Instead of carrying on to Downham we took a detour to Downham Mill, which is down a track on the right,off the road to Rimington. In the past like nearby Twiston Mill , it was a medieval water powered cornmill. Both mills are no longer mills, but do have ponds and millstones.

Downham Mill.

Old Millstone.

It is possible to walk past Downham Mill and over the fields to Twiston. Instead we took a footpath on the right before the mill, which lead us over some hilly fields to the village of Downham.

Hugo having a mad do.

Star on waymarker.

Jelly Ear Fungi.

Pendle Hill with snow covering blends into the white sky.

Downham brook.

The ice-cream shop on Hare Green.

Open for brews, cake, sandwiches….and ice-cream. Brrrrrrrrr!

Sheep doing lunch.

The toilets in the car park were actually open. Yay!

Downham dwellings.

Up at St Leonard’s Church in the village there are nice views of Pendle Hill, still blending into the sky.

Sun dial in the churchyard.

Cemetery snowdrops.

Pendle from the porch.

The Assheton Arms from the churchyard.

Hide and seek sheep.

We walked back to Chatburn , passing this unusual breed of sheep again. Anyone know what they are?

Thanks for dropping by..

On The Riverside.

Today was one of those days when I really wish I had taken my camera out with me, instead of just my phone. This frosty walk along the river from home to the village of Chatburn gave lots of photographic opportunities of the feathered variety. I counted Grey Herons, Little Egrets, Canada Geese, Moorhens, Kestrel, Goosanders and Wagtails .

We don’t often walk on the left hand side of the Ribble on this route for some reason, so it was nice to see the surrounding countryside from a different perspective. Clitheroe’s industrial landscape appeared sporadically in the distance.

Mute Swan.

Mary Horner’s attractive carved bench was particularly striking. Was she a shepherdess I wonder….

Alder catkins.

A type of polypore fungi.

After a brew and sausage roll in the village of Chatburn we chose to walk back home on the road, though another great way to get back to Clitheroe is of course along the other side of the river.

Thanks for joining me on a Winter’s day stroll.

Sabden and Churn Clough Reservoir.

More and more this year, we have discovered places local to us that we haven’t really taken notice of before. One such village is Sabden , just over the other side of Pendle . Nestled in its own valley under the bulk of Lancashire’s most famous hill, Sabden is said to be 2 degrees cooler than any of its neighbors. With that in mind we dressed for Winter on Saturdays 3.5 mile hike from Sabden to Churn Clough Reservoir. We parked at the village car park, where we met a friend and his two Bedlingtons who joined us.

Basically this walk can be made much shorter by not even venturing into Sabden, there is roadside parking before you descend into the village. Personally I am glad we saw at least a small part of Sabden. Or you can include the reservoir in a much longer hike around the valley. Here are some photos from our walk.

Badger Wells Cottages.

Not sure what this flower is, but love it’s vibrant purple colour.

There was a little terrier watching us from the downstairs right window in this pretty cottage.

A striking sunflower bench. No time to rest though..

I love that Gorse can flower all year round.

Finger Post Sign.

We did somehow take a bit of a detour up the hill a bit ( not my idea 🀣) , so the reservoir materialised quite a distance away. Churn Clough Reservoir was built in the late 1800s and extended in the 1920s. It is used for fishing and there is a good footpath round it.

Churn Clough Reservoir.

Melting snow.

Pew with a view.

Several cormerants were diving for fish.

A rather nice house that looks over the water.

Unfortunately this walkway was blocked off.

Churn Clough dam.

Goodbye Churn Clough.

A typical Sabden cottage.

And an appropriate pub sign for a Pendleside village.

Knitted Nativity. ❀️

I am looking forward to returning to Sabden and it’s scenically set reservoir. Another local gem found.

What has been your favourite local discovery this year? There have been so many…..

Clitheroe to Mitton Circular Walk.

Just a quick post featuring a walk today from home. We set out about 8 am hoping to miss the heat, it was already getting warm early on. Luckily for Hugo this is another route taking in the river Ribble ,so he had plenty of opportunities for paddles and swims.

Today’s walk is a circular route from Clitheroe to Mitton and back. It’s one we have walked a few times over the years.

Heading for the railway bridge.

Mearley Brook.

Approaching the Ribble Way.

There’s a newish photography aid down Edisford.

Edisford Bridge.

Quackers.

We have now crossed the bridge and are walking along the other side of the river towards Mitton. We pass through a little wood.

And carry on down the riverside.

Mama and brood.

Up through another little wood and we find this newly carved bear chair, which has appeared during lockdown.

We follow the footpath signs to Mitton, passing Great Mitton Hall.

Over the bridge near the Aspinall Arms.

The Aspinall arms is somewhere we would ordinarily stop off at for refreshment. Huge beer garden and dog friendly.

Next to the pub footpaths can be followed back to Clitheroe.

I heard a piping call. It belonged to a Common Sandpiper.

Nearly home and more content cattle relaxing in the sun. πŸ™‚

Have you got out and about this weekend?

Caton Riverside Walk.

Today dawned sunny and warm , we got up pretty early, setting off from Clitheroe at 8am and driving through the beautiful Trough of Bowland and on to Caton , a village by the river Lune. Tantilising glimpses of sparkling blue sea could be viewed as we passed Jubilee Tower. We were however intent on a riverside walk.

At Caton we parked at the Bull Beck picnic site and car park. After crossing the road we joined an old railway walk/cycle path ( now part of the River Lune Millennium Park) and then ambled back along the river, about 4 miles in total.

Stone eisel depicting Railway walk/ cycleway.

Blue Sky.

Bug B & B ( open for business, I presume).

Squirrel checking out prospective breakfasts..

There was already a breakfast guest. 😘

I was so happy to see this gorgeous bullfinch…..and he posed for pictures. πŸ™‚

Otter carving near the Crook O’ Lune picnic site..

And another. ❀️

Bridge at Crook O’ Lune.

Crook O’ Lune.

Reflections.

Ducklings.

Shallow Weir.

Riverside hide.

Relaxing by the Lune.

Spot the tiny Hugo.

Aquaduct.

There were several of these stone fence posts in the field.

Footbridge over Artle brook.

Hundreds of Sand Martins nest in the sandy river bank. They dart around so fast. I couldn’t believe it when one landed on a nearby fence. πŸ™‚

Beautiful Sand Martin. 😘

Can just make out the flat top of Ingleborough in the distance.

Another hide.

Oyster catcher on shingle.

Hugo on shingle.

Following the river.

Young bull. Earlier we almost got stampeded by a group of cattle when a farmer was herding them to this field in his tractor. Don’t think he saw us ( hoping not) and we escaped just in time. Yikes!

Young bulls. All much calmer when not being chased by a cross farmer.

No more photos but we are almost back at the car park/ picnic site at Bull Beck. Amazingly the public toilets are actually open. Result!

After brunch ( it’s still only 10-45) we decide to head home through the Trough of Bowland. I had found another walk that looked nice at Abbeystead, but when we arrived it had gotten busy. Everyone else had the same idea! Another time perhaps.

We really enjoyed our River Lune walk. Such a tranquil beautiful morning. ❀️πŸ₯Ύ

Walk Book ~ Walking in the Forest of Bowland and Pendle by Terry Marsh.

Map ~ Explorer OL41 ( Forest of Bowland & Ribblesdale).

Higham Circular Walk ~ The Sabden Valley.

I hope to bring you a few more photos from Lancashire walks whilst lockdown continues. 🌹

Higham nestles at the foot of Pendle Hill and the Pendle Way is a walking route which can be accessed from the village. The area has many associations with the Pendle Witches. Higham was home to several reputed victims of ‘ the witch ‘ Chattox. She allegedly turned the ale sour in the village pub ‘ The Four All’s Inn ‘ and bewitched the landlords son to death. She along with eight other people were hung on a hill above Lancaster for witchcraft in 1612.

On a more cheery note Higham was also the birthplace of Jonas Moore, who became known as ‘ The Father Of Time’ owing to his key role in establishing Greenwich Mean Time and the Greenwich Meridian. Not bad going for a Lancashire lad…

This walk is a 5.5 mile hike through a gorse strewn valley with lots of views of Pendle , old cobbled tracks and skies full of tumbling swift’s and swallows on a Sunday morning in May.

A Pendle Way sign above Higham.

Golden gorse.

Pendle Hill from above Higham.

Old wall.

Friendly horses, one in a rather posh cerice jacket. πŸ™‚

A lovely Dapple Grey who wouldn’t pose for a photo.

A beautiful Grade ll listed cottage with mullioned windows..

Geese. πŸ™‚

One was obviously a Guard Goose.

Unusual carvings.

At another farm ~ a gorgeous guinea fowl..

And a friendly mog.

Onwards along a cobbled track.

Footpath sign.

Looking back towards Pendle.

Climbing a small hill and admiring Pendle, or stopping to catch my breath. πŸ˜‰

Sheep & lamb.

Over the top of the hill..

Time for a snack.

Heading back to the village.

Wall Brown πŸ¦‹

The Four Alls Inn.

The Four Alls on the pub sign denote the following.

The King rules all.
The Priest prays for all.
The Soldier fights for all.
The Common Man pays for all.

I was really surprised by this walk. Lots of history and gorgeous scenery in what was once royal hunting ground ‘ The Forest Of Pendle’ . The area is actually now an AONB and deservedly so I think.

X

Walking Book – Guide To Lancashire Pub Walks by Nick Burton.

Map – OS Explorer OL21 South Pennines.

Dean Clough Reservoir Walk.

On Saturday we drove ten minutes out of town for our permitted socially distanced exercise. It’s the first time I have left Clitheroe in six weeks. Wil still drives to Blackburn for work five days a week, so he wasn’t as excited to be out in the car as I was. It’s been a while! Anyway I think the change of scenery did me good. Apart from the odd dog walker, it was fairly quiet at Dean Clough Reservoir, a pretty body of water above York village near Whalley. We parked in a lay by outside the village and soon found the footpath that leads down to the reservoir.

At this time of year the golden yellow gorse flowers are all in bloom, giving off a heavenly coconut fragrance. There were bees buzzing round bugles and I saw my first swallows of the year.

In a few weeks the Yellow Flag Irises will come into flower, for now they are letting the marsh marigolds and cuckoo flowers take all the glory.

On the water we saw various birds including cormorant, Canada geese, mallards and this gorgeous Great Crested Grebe.

Instead of following the path around the reservoir we took another trail up to some rocky outcrops and admired the views for a little while. Butterflies fluttered by in a gentle spring time breeze.

We took the path back into York which is a small hamlet with a nice looking pub called the Lord Nelson. Hopefully it will open back up in the coming months. Spied some belties at a nearby farm.

Back where we had parked the car, this was our view! A rather large man standing on a small hill.

It’s a sculpture of some kind but I haven’t been able to find any information online about why it’s there. In the future will have to walk up to it for a closer look. 😁

Thanks for reading & stay safe. x

Sunday Sevens 12th April 2020.

How has your week been? Mine hasn’t been too bad considering. Along with a few volunteer shops ( I have a couple of regulars now which is nice) ,I’ve been trying to vary my local walks with Hugo as much as possible. We are lucky to live in a town surrounded by countryside. The ever expanding house building seems to have stopped for now, so plenty of places to explore within walking distance. Anyway here are a few pics from the last 7 days.

Love this little bridge. Though had to get Hugo in the brook here after he started rolling in something suspect. Luckily some doggy paddles in the deep parts got rid of whatever it was!

This was a hot afternoon walk. See Pendle Hill in the distance.

I’ve actually baked more in the last week than in the last year! Your wondering how I got hold of flour….Well I found a stash in the back of the cupboard that I must have bought yonks ago. Now that I’m actually baking, I’m going at it like the clappers. With varying results…..

Rock cakes turned out well. My friend Lisa sent me the recipe. ❀️

Brownie was like a flat splat. Not great. 🀣

Choc chip Banana Bread a success! Very yummy. 😘

Wil has this weekend off work so that’s been nice. We’ve watched quite a few films recently, my favourites being the fabulous Daniel Craig Who Done It Knives Out and the quirky independent film The Peanut Butter Falcon.

Knives Out Fan Art off Pinterest.

We had bought some paint to paint the shed up at the caravan. But as we won’t be visiting there for a while, Wil is on a roll with sprucing up our back yard. Voila our new looking blue yard shed.

Eating out by the shed.

Easter Bunny visited. ❀️

The Easter Bunny still visited! He must be classed as a key worker. 😘

Thanks for dropping by. Stay safe. X

Three Cumbrian Seaside villages visited with Hugo. πŸ•

If your looking for miles of dog friendly coastline then you’ve hit the jackpot in Cumbria. Because most people head for the lakes and fells, the beaches are almost always quiet, few having any dog restrictions at all.

We recently spent four nights in the coastal village of Ravenglass, and visited a couple of other seaside resorts whilst we were there. All three are served by the Cumbrian Coastal Railwayline.

Ravenglass. A tiny harbor village, Ravenglass has an ancient history. The Roman settlement of Glannoventa stood here and was an important naval base. The remains of a Roman bathhouse lie on the outskirts.

The beach is a mixture of sand, shingle and mud. There are lots of well signposted walks along the coast or up into the fells. Our dog Hugo enjoyed running here and his favourite nearby hill walk from Ravenglass was a mornings yomp up Muncaster Fell.

Nearby pet friendly attractions include Muncaster Castle ( dogs are allowed in the gardens, grounds, cafe and can watch the flying hawk displays & heron feeds) and The Ravenglass & Eskdale Narrow Gauge Railway.

Hugo was made a fuss of in all three of the pubs in Ravenglass. We ate out at The Ratty Arms & The Pennington Hotel. Both were very good. 🐢

Ravenglass

Useful sign. πŸ˜‰

Hugo rides The Ratty ( Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway).

Yummy food at The Pennington Hotel.

Ravenglass.

St Bees. Twenty minutes north of Ravenglass, St Bees is actually named after an Irish medieval Saint, St Bega . Bega ( a beautiful & devout princess) fled across the Irish Sea by boat, having been promised in marriage to a Viking Prince. She had other ideas, preferring to live in religious solitude on the English mainland.

I’m not sure if St Bega liked dogs ( there is a statue of her and her rowing boat in the village center) but the beach she landed on is a great place for a bracing walk. We took Hugo to the sands at Seacote Park, where there is a caravan park, lifeboat station and beach cafe. I don’t think dogs are allowed inside the cafe but as it was a nice day we had icecream on a bench outside and Hugo was brought water & dog treats.

St Bees is the start of the Wainwright Coast to Coast walk and the cliff top ( safely fenced off ~ Phew!) is also ideal for walkies. Look out for all sorts of seabirds. The cliffs at St Bees head are an RSPB bird reserve.

The beach below St Bees Head.

Cliff top flowers.

On the cliffs.

Anchor from shipwreck.

Arnside. A pretty estuary resort, Arnside resides in the Arnside & Silverdale Area Of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is from here that I took part in The Morecambe Bay Cross Bay walk with Wil and Hugo, three years ago. This iconic organized hike across the shifting sands of Morecambe Bay must not be attempted without an official guide.

On our latest visit Hugo had a good run on the beach but there are also plenty of coastal and inland walks to do in the area including Arnside Knott and along the shoreline to Silverdale. Do make sure you listen out for the sirens that are sounded to warn of the incoming Arnside Tidal Bore, a high tidal wave that happens once a month in Arnside’s estuary.

The village has a couple of dog friendly pubs and cafes. We chose to sit outside with the best ever fish & chips from Arnside Chippy. We also visited a very cute little jazz cafe opposite Arnside’s Railway station. Moochin About is a teeny tiny espresso bar with the cutest decor and vinyl jazz records playing on a record player. Sad to say no doggies allowed inside, purely because it is so small. There are two benches outside though, water bowls and the lovely owner brought out biscuits for Hugo and a collie customer. πŸ•

Looking over the Kent Estuary.

Windswept Selfie.

Windswept Hawthorn.

Moochin About.

More Moochin About.

If you have a dog, what beaches do you like to visit with them?

I’d love to know. πŸ©πŸšπŸ¦€

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