Tag Archives: lancashire

A Walk And A Winter Watchlist.

I stole the list below from BBC Winterwatch, some wildlife which can be seen at this time of year, on a typical Winters day walk in the UK.

  • Singing Robin ~ Easy.
  • Corvid Roost ~ Easy.
  • First Snowdrops ~ Easy.
  • Scent of Gorse flowers ~ Easy.
  • Jelly Ear Fungus ~ Easy.
  • Hazel Catkins ~ Medium.
  • Great Spotted Woodpecker drumming ~ Medium.
  • Overwintering migrant birds gathering ~ Medium.
  • Fox screeching at night ~ Medium.
  • Overwintering insects ~ Medium.
  • Winter Moth ~ Medium.
  • Hair Ice ~ Hard.
  • Mistle Thrush guarding winter berries ~ Hard.
  • Glue crust fungus ~ Hard.

This morning my locality was monochrome! We decided to walk from Clitheroe to Pendleton village and then along the bridle path to Mearley , passing the farmhouse I grew up in and then back home via Worston village. This walk has appeared on my blog before , though never in Winter.

I must admit I was hoping to find a little more snow and early on I wasn’t disappointed. We also spotted a few of the easy to see items on the watchlist too.

Kemple rising above the mist.
Standen.
Jelly Ear Fungus.
Snowy seedhead.

Pendleton lies at the foot of Pendle Hill near the nick of Pendle. Unfortunately it was foggy today so the hill became obscured by the mist after I took the photo below.

Approaching Pendleton.
Pendleton brook.
Swirly hedge.
Red Barn door.
All Saints church.
Red gate.
All the gates seem to be painted red near the village.
Monochrome.
Robin Red Breast.
Snow sheep. πŸ™‚
Mearley hamlet.

I still have relatives in the area and my lovely cousins made us a socially distanced outdoors brew ( a treat indeed! ) which warmed us up for the continuation of our walk.

Rookery.
What Ewe looking at?
Holly.

Believe it or not, this is actually the first Holly I have seen with berries all Winter. The berries are an important sorce of food for birds in the colder months and trees are supposedly a protection against witchcraft. Appropriate in the Pendle countryside, home of the Lancashire witches….

The world is turning green.
Kestrel.
Little Mearley Hall.

As a child I lived in the tenanted farmhouse above. Little Mearley dates back to 1590 and my bedroom was the mullioned bay window room. I have happy memories of growing up there, though as a 16 year old
, all I wanted was to move into town.

Grey Heron.
A Worston house gateway.
More sheep. πŸ™‚
Fields of green.
Heading home.

Afternoon and heading back to Clitheroe, the snow had all but gone.

Have you spotted anything yourself from the Winter Watchlist?

Januarying.

I am treating January as I usually do. It’s my month of keeping snug and cosy inside, with a healthy dose of fresh air and exercise. I also like to plan holidays and weekends away at this time of year, so have been researching our little holiday in North Norfolk during May and weekend walks in the Eden Valley, for when we can get back up to the caravan.

Continuing Winter cheer with my window display. The Robins mimic my real life robin visitor. The hyacinth plant I found in Sainsbury’s for a bargain 65p is now flowering and giving off a delicious scent, resembling woods of bluebells.

Winter Walks.

I’ve been looking for more walks from home. Although I thought we had been just about everywhere on our doorstep, I was proved wrong last weekend, when we discovered new to us footpaths. I’m sure there are more to explore!

There will be another place to wander when Clitheroe’s new Nature Reserve opens. It is very local indeed. I have nosed over the fence a couple of times and I spied several Teal on the water. πŸ™‚ Can’t wait for a proper look.

The RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch is all set for the last weekend of January. I have signed up as usual and am looking forward to seeing which feathered visitors turn up in the hour.

Primrose Nature Reserve. πŸ¦‰πŸ¦‰ Photo from their Facebook page.
Bridgerton. It’s a bodice ripper.

Incase you are looking for some on screen escapism, here is a list of what I’ve enjoyed watching recently. Most are series and there’s one film. But let me say this, my list is one of mostly guilty pleasures. πŸ˜„

  • Bridgerton. Netflix. Regency romance with lots of drama, comedy, gossip & scandal.
  • Derry Girls. All 4 / Netflix. Coming of age comedy set during ‘ the troubles’ in nineties Northern Ireland.
  • Ghosts. BBC I Player. Spirited comedy about the ghostly inhabitants of a haunted house, from the creators of Horrible Histories
  • Winter Walks. BBC I Player. Join well known faces as they film their favourite walks in Yorkshire. I miss Yorkshire. ❀️
  • Eurovision Song Contest : The Story Of Fire Saga. Netflix. Very cheesy but enjoyable musical comedy film set in Iceland and Edinburgh.
  • The Masked Singer. ITV/ ITV Hub. Addictive crazy singing competition.
  • Home For Christmas. Netflix. Norwegian rom com series.
  • Sneaky Pete. Amazon Prime. Crime drama about a con man who assumes the identity of his cellmate to escape from a vengeful mobster.
  • The Queen’s Gambit. Netflix. An orphans rise against the odds to become the Worlds number one chess player.
  • All Creatures Great And Small. My 5. Heart warming 1940s comedy drama about a young vet who accepts a job in a Yorkshire Dales Vetinary practice. This is a remake of the original series, and just as good. ❀️
Winter Reading.

It’s nice to find a nice cosy read and I did in Winter Holiday from the Swallows and Amazon’s children’s book series by Arthur Ransome. I am immersed in a world of frozen lakes, snowy igloos and secret signals. Thanks to the What is it about books ? blog for the recommendation. ❀️

So this is my first foray into using the new WordPress editor. I hope it turns out okay.

Do leave me your own thoughts on how you are spending January?

Snowy Scenes.

Even a smattering of snow completely changes the look and feel of a place. Clitheroe Castle this morning ,before the betwixmas crowds landed ,had a magical quality about it. I took these photos with my phone on an early walk with Hugo. ❀️

Later today a friend asked me if fancied going for a Pendle Hill walk. I did not hesitate. I wanted to experience some more of the white stuff. 😁 Once parked , we headed to the Wellsprings at the Nick ,where we bought take away sausage butties & hot chocs before stepping into a winter wonderland. My friend took most of these lovely pictures. ❀️

A truelly enjoyable day. ❄️❄️❄️❄️❄️❄️❄️

2020 ~ My Year In Photos.

I always do a yearly review post, and well even if 2020 has been a bit pants,I’m looking through my photos and there has still been plenty of stuff to be thankful for. We have survived living through a Global Pandemic. That can only be a good thing!

A walk up Pendle Hill in January.

In January was Wil’s 5Oth Birthday and thankfully he got to celebrate with friends in real life. Yay! Though planned trips and gigs to continue the celebrations through the rest of 2020 have been delayed, hopefully he can carry them over to next year……

A Kieffer Sutherland Concert in Blackburn.

February. A pretty quiet month. I think we would have gone out more, if only we had realised that our lives would change quite dramatically, in just a few short weeks.

Celandines.

March. Wil, Hugo and I managed a wknd away at our caravan in Cumbria before lockdown was announced. Then one day in early March I was sent home from work….and never went back. Luckily I was furloughed and Wil has remained in his job throughout 2020. Having him carry on going to work as normal meant our everyday lives didn’t change as much as some people’s.

Something that turned out right ~ Rock Buns.

April. We had a long dry Spring which for me meant lots of walks with Hugo….and lots of baking. I can’t say my baking skills improved that much, but I did manage to make both Banana Bread and Rock Cakes. I never tried the Joe Wicks Workouts though, so I have put on a few pounds. 🧐

A glorious walk along the Lune in Caton.

May. One positive thing about travel restrictions this year , discovering more of my home county of Lancashire. I must admit in previous years we have hopped over the border to The Dales or had days out in The Lake District, rather than explore locally. Lancashire is lovely too. I appreciate what’s on my doorstep more now.

Socially distanced meet up in the park.

June. Sometime in June restrictions eased and friends were allowed to meet up again…outdoors. The new going out became drinking in the park ,like a bunch of teenagers. πŸ˜‰

Van Life.

July. Finally we were allowed to stay over at our caravan once again. Having bought it in Summer 2019 , Wil and I had been looking forward to spending lots of quality time there this year. Luckily we managed to grab a few weekends away in Summer.

Eskdale with friends.

August. Wow things were beginning to feel almost normal. We had the best time spending a long weekend in Ravenglass & Eskdale with friends.

Bad Hair Day 🀣 Bonscale Pike.

September. Managed to add a few more Wainwright’s to my very short list, using the van as our base. New additions are Arthur’s Pike, Bonscale Pike above, Hallin Fell and even Skiddaw.

Autumn fun.

October. Autumn colours were glorious in 2020 and I noticed far more different species of fungi than any other year. Enjoyed a few nice walks with family , which is always good. Found a new job cleaning in a local secondary school ( phew!) after the cafe business I had worked in until March finally admitted it wouldn’t be opening up again.

C’mon Mum, let’s play ball….

November. Back in lockdown for a month. Blah. Bad timing for little old me as I had been looking forward to going out for my birthday, somewhat optimistically. My lovely friends did organize me my first Zoom Party though. 😊

Christmas πŸŒ²β˜ƒοΈ

December. Christmas has actually been pretty good , considering. Lots of walks with friends & or family. Socially distanced meet ups & a very nice Christmas dinner bought from Holmes Mill. ❀️

I know that the next few months will probably mean we move up a tier in Lancashire and things will probably get worse before they get better, but here’s hoping for a very happy and healthy 2021.

Thanks for bobbing by occasionally, I really appreciate it.

Autumn walk to Dunsop Bridge. πŸ„πŸ₯ΎπŸ

We joined my sister and kids for a walk along the river Hodder into Dunsop Bridge, a village that claims to be at the very centre of the UK. Lots of Autumn colours and plenty of fungi finds too. We parked by the stone bridge over the river just outside Whitewell.

River Hodder.

Pheasant.

A Lonk Tup.

A mushroom that looks like a small fried egg.

Bridge over the Hodder.

My sister navigates a wonky bridge.

Riverside.

One of two stone otters by the river outside Thorneyholme Hall.

Another bridge, near Thorneyholme Hall.

Honey Fungi, possibly.

Thorneyholme Hall, currently empty I think.

More unidentified Fungi.

And more amongst the leaves.

https://www.ribblevalley-e-bikes.co.uk/ opened in the village over Lockdown.

Anyone know what this is by the bridge?

Fun in the leaves.

Shaggy Inkcap.

Hello Ewe.

On our way back we crossed over the bridge. However if you have a dog, you may have to carry your pooch over, due to the holes in it. πŸ™ƒ

Another Hodder view.

Autumn colours.

Walking back to the car.

This walk was a very enjoyable 4 miles, with a brew and biscuits bought from Puddleducks Tea Room in the village,which is presently operating as a take away. I think we will return πŸ™‚

A Wander To Waddington.

Sunday was a sunny day surprise, so a walk from home beckoned. The suggestion of a wander to the nearby village of Waddington …and lunch, was an attractive proposition. We set off late morning, passing through the grounds of Clitheroe Castle, by the River Ribble and then along the road to our destination.

Clitheroe Castle ~ the second smallest castle keep in the country.

Trinity Church, built in 1887.

A track down Back Commons.

Stone steps down to the river.

Waddow Hall on the opposite side of the Ribble. The Hall is used by Girl Guiding UK.

A white washed cottage surrounded by cows.

Brungerley Bridge and a high river.

Heading into Waddington.

Apparently Waddington is named after its founder, an 8th century Anglo-Saxon chieftain called Wadda. This pretty village has probably won the accolade of Lancashire’s Best Kept Village, more than any other. The picturesque coronation gardens might have something to do with it.

Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.

Waddington’s Coronation Gardens.

War Memorial Cross.

Village centre.

St Helens Church, a focal point of the village.

There are three pubs in the village, my personal favourite being The Lower Buck, which is a friendly welcoming independent watering hole. Does delicious pub grub too, so a perfect place for lunch. It was warm enough to sit outside in the sunshine.

Lower Buck looking pretty in the Autumn sun.

Love the pub sign.

A nice surprise inside, the pub pup. ❀️

Lunch time.

And someone is watching us eat.

After dinner we headed home via the country lane to Low Moor and back into Clitheroe.

Grey Heron.

Blue sky and Pendle Hill in the very distance.

One of two stags that adorn the entrance to a farm.

The bridge to Low Moor on the outskirts of Clitheroe.

Did you enjoy a sunny Sunday?

Back On The Tolkien Trail. πŸ§™β€β™‚οΈπŸ₯Ύ

Although I’ve posted about The Tolkien Trail on my blog before, I walked it again recently with my sister and family, and thought it worth another look. Undoubtedly this tranquil area of Lancashire inspired J. R. R. Tolkien , he often stayed here whilst visiting his son John who attended Stonyhurst College. The Lord Of The Rings author enjoyed walking in the lovely leafy Hurst Green countryside and local place names and landmarks made it into his writings.

On this occasion we followed the route starting at The Shireburn Arms , the 17th century Inn was named after the rich land owning Shireburn family. A river Shirebourn features in The Lord Of The Rings.

Hurst Green village centre.

A Tolkien quote near The Shireburn Arms.

A glorious clump of Purple Loosestrife. ❀️

Aqueduct.

Our walk very nearly got abandoned. At this point we were meant to be following the riverside but a herd of frisky cows showed too much interest in Hugo the Labrador. We made a hasty retreat up a hill and managed to rejoin the river later.

A house called ‘ Jumbles’ named after Jumbles’ rocks, pertruding stones in the river Ribble.

River depth gage.

Hugo.

Hacking Hall in the background.

The heavens kept opening ( and the sun shone too! ) as we followed the trail. To be honest the walk could really benefit from a few Lord of the Rings inspired sculptures or scribbles along the route, I reckon. Anyway above is Hacking Hall from where the Hacking Ferry boat still operated in Tolkien’s time at Stonyhurst. The ferry was possibly the inspiration for his ‘ Bucklebury Ferry’ .

This old oak is mentioned in The Woodland Trusts Ancient Tree Inventory.

Winckley Hall Farm.

Tree climbers.

Cromwell’s Bridge from Lower Hodder.

Cromwell’s Bridge over the river Hodder may have been the inspiration for Tolkien’s ‘ Brandywine’ bridge. It is named after Oliver Cromwell ,who along with his troops rode over the skinny stone structure, on their way from Gisburn to The Battle of Preston. We followed the riverside up through shady woodland past Hodder court.

Corn crops a long the Holder.

Cuckoo Pint Berry Stalks.

Windey path through the woods.

Up above.

Stepping out.

Eventually we ended up in the grounds of Stonyhurst college, though I didn’t manage to get many photos. And then back to the car parked in Hurst Green. The trail covered 6 or 7 miles in total.

Stonyhurst college grounds from behind.

Alm houses in Hurst Green.

I must confess I have never read any Tolkien, though I enjoyed watching The Lord Of The Rings films. When walking the trail you probably need to research the areas connections beforehand, as there is no signage or information on the route. Nevertheless this was an enjoyable hike around a lovely area. πŸ₯Ύ

Here is a recent post from The Bowland Climber who was in the area too.

The Tolkien Trail can be downloaded online and can be found in numerous local walk books. I used…

Walks Around Clitheroe ~ Terry Marsh.

Under The Railway Bridge.

I have been noticing lately how lovely a local field is looking. All-sorts of flowers have been popping up this year. Makes me wonder if someone has been scattering seeds? The plants have been absolutely buzzing with bees and grasshoppers. Meadow Brown’s , Ringlets and Skippers are flying in abundance. I’m eager to see what else will turn up over the Summer. Will keep you posted. 😘

There could be more clover than grass in the field and they smell really sweet, especially in the sunshine after a shower.

Pops of colour are certainly provided by the burnt orange blooms of the Orange Hawkweed, which is also known as Devils Paintbrush and Fox & Cubs.

I think this is a member of the Crane’s -bill family , maybe Druce’s Cranes-Bill.

Tutsan is the largest of the St John’s Wort flowering plants. I was quite surprised to find it amongst the vegetation. I like how there are both flowers and berries.

I noticed a couple of Silver Y Moths fluttering around the thistles. They are migrant moths that fly day and night and can be identified by the metallic y on each wing.

Love-in-a-mist is not a wildflower, so I’m not sure how this bloom ended up here. I love it’s delicate and intricate design.

By the brook a Yarrow peeps , it’s leaves are feathery. In the past this plant was used on bloody wounds, but sticking it up your nose causes nosebleeds apparently. πŸ™„

Skippers are seen resting on buttercups and darting from flower to flower. They are tiny butterflies, however I cannot tell whether they are the large or small species.

In the grass I spy Fairy Flax which looks like it should be in a fairies garden.

Along with ringlets there are lots of Meadow Browns in the field. They are very fond of the thistles. πŸ™‚

So that’s all for now. There are foxgloves and teasel but I will save them for another post. πŸ™‚

Clitheroe, Pendleton & Worston Walk.

Recent times have given me opportunity to explore new walks in my local area and also revisit places from my past. Although I live in a small market town, I grew up in the countryside. Of course at 17 I was only to happy to move away to ‘the big City’ , that’s what Clitheroe felt like to a country bumpkin like me back then. πŸ™‚ I will never forget my farming roots though , as much as I love living somewhere with shops, pubs and friends, I do still feel at home clomping round the fields.

This is a walk from Clitheroe, through the pretty village of Pendleton, passing the farm I grew up on at the foot of Pendle Hill and taking in the small village of Worston. Most of the route has featured on my blog before at various times, but there’s usually something new to spot.

A woodland path past Standen Hall.

After crossing the A59 we walk into Pendleton. Lots of old cottages here.

And a pub called The Swan With Two Necks which is currently selling take way ales.

Pendleton is called ‘ Peniltune’ in the Domesday book.

Love this bright red gate. ❀️

Time to cross the road.

Heading through one of the farms in the hamlet of Mearley.

A sign for a new ( ish ) holiday let in Mearley.

Sunbathing cows.

Knowle Top farm looking down over Mearley.

Hugo and stick.

Mearley.

Little Mearley Hall where I grew up, at the foot of Pendle Hill.

Worsaw Hill in the distance.

Orange Hawkweed aka Fox & Cubs ,on the grass verges.

Interesting gate sign in Worston village.

Pendle Hill from Worston.

Rockery garden in Worston.

Honesty box eggs.

My first photo of a hare!

Little & Large. ❀️

Thanks for joining us on another local stroll.

Weets Hill Walk. πŸ₯Ύ

We found a peaceful moorland walk on Sunday. I guess it was so quiet because of the drizzly weather. It soon fined up though and we happily abandoned our waterproof jackets. Yay!

Our walk started from a canal side car park near the Anchor Inn at Salterforth near Barnoldswick. This isn’t an area we have explored before and despite having a map and walking book we did get a bit lost ( shocker! ) but it all worked out ok in the end.

The route headed up into the rugged moorland of Weets Hill where there are fantastic views and even some unusual art work. Here are some images from our 6.5 mile hike.

Leeds & Liverpool Canal.

Canal side way marker.

Buttercup meadow.

A narrow squeeze style which I could barely squeeze through. πŸ˜…

Ground nesting birds sign. We made sure we kept to the bridleway.

This old track is called Lister Well Road.

Caught on camera.

Lister Well Road.

Lower Foulridge Reservoir…maybe. Anybody know?

I can’t help pointing out Lister Well Road ! Lister is my family name. 😊

Blacko Tower in the distance.

Cuteness overload ❀️.

Hungry horse.

Looking toward Pendle Hill.

‘ Heading’ for Duck Pond Farm.

There is actually a head at Duck Pond Farm. πŸ™‚

And another!

A former occupant ( an art teacher) made the large head sculptures.

Fitting all our big heads in a selfie.

Heading away from Duck Pond Farm. A beautiful white horse.❀️

Getting in some dawn chorus practice..

Cotton grass.

Buttercups.

Think there’s a troll under the bridge.

This is Hugo’s cute pose…..only done when he is watching someone eat. Look into my eyes!!

Meadow Pippit collecting nesting material.

Weets Hill Moorland.

Heath Bedstraw.

A Barnoldswick chimney.

Somebody’s watching me.

Foxglove.

Pink grass. Anyone know their grass? 😁

And back to the canal tow path.

The Anchor Inn….. apparently holds an impressive stalactite formation in the cellar.

This walk was definitely all about the views , the wildlife ( we were serenaded by the continuous chatter of pippits and skylarks) and those unforgettable sculptures at Duck pond farm.

Walking Book – Walking in the Forest of Bowland and Pendle by Terry Marsh.

Map – Explorer OL21 ( South Pennines).