Tag Archives: river ribble

Ribble side ramble. πŸ¦†

The weather is so surprising at the moment. Blue skies then snow. Warm sunshine. Then snow. And repeat.

I am wondering what to wear for a week night beer garden drink. Looking in my wardrobe, I seriously haven’t bought any new going out clothes since 2019! Pjamas ~ yes. Walking pants~ yes. But no new tops or dresses. However I suspect I will still be frequenting my warm puffa jacket for any approaching social activities!

At present social activities still revolve around walking, so here are some photos from yesterday’s walk along the river to Chatburn and back. A repeat of a post I did earlier in the year, but a little more wildlife on display. πŸ™‚

One of many picture slabs in Brungerley park. A fox and a hare gaze at the moon.
A hunched heron.
Greylag and Canada Geese.
Golden forsythia blossom.
A lone mute swan.
Hipping Stones.
Mary Horner’s bench.
Gushing.
Beautiful blackthorn.
Twisty tree.
Bridge at Grindleton.
In the Woods.
Primrose.
By the Ribble.
Hipping Stones.
Hipping Stones.
Female Goosander. A favourite water bird. Love her Nut brown quiff.
Hugo waiting to play ball.
Wood Anemones or Wind Flowers.
Dog Violet.
Love this cherry blossom painting.

Hope you have had a pleasant weekend.

Bird Count, Elfcups & Snowdrops.

The weekends activities included the RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch. Hurrah! Something to do, and really quite ideal for lockdown. I must admit though I didn’t have the most exciting hour. My newly filled feeders seemed to be regarded with suspicion by the resident sparrows. Not one bird ventured from the foliage behind the garden shed. What was going on!

Nowt going on at the feeding station.
Female House Sparrow.

I counted 8 sparrows during the sixty minutes I sat glued to the window, camera at the ready. For all that time they mostly stayed hidden in the ivy. Then about five minutes before my hour was up I noticed a much bigger bird had landed in the greenery. It was mostly obscured but I noticed a long speckled tail through the leaves. It wasn’t a pigeon! Then suddenly it flew higher and all was revealed. A sparrowhawk! No wonder my little feathered visitors were staying away from the food. They didn’t intend to be food themselves.

Sorry to say I didn’t get a photo of my raptor visitor. Think I was in shock. 😲 But I have added Sparrowhawk to my birdcount results for the first time ever.

Meanwhile my sister and family were doing the birdcount at the same time as me. I usually join them but unfortunately not this year. πŸ˜” They had a really successful hour with Nuthatch, Long Tailed Tits, Pheasants, Kestrel and a Wren included in the final tally. πŸ™‚

Not all eyes are on the cake!
Long Tailed Tits galore.

After lunch Wil, Hugo and I headed out for a walk from Clitheroe , taking in the fields and River Ribble near Waddow Hall. Plenty of wildlife out this afternoon and an enjoyable 4 mile ramble from home and back.

Scarlet Elf cups.
Scarlet Elf cups.

I was delighted to find some Scarlet Elf Cups, such vibrant pops of colour in the winter landscape. They are also called Red Cups, Moss Cups and Fairies Baths. In folklore Wood Elves drink morning dew from them. Scarlet Elf Cups are most commonly found on mossy decaying branches on the woodland floor.

Robin.
Snowdrops.

I saw plenty of Snowdrops in people’s front gardens today , it was also nice to see some wild ones too. A real sign that Spring is on the way. ❀️

Finger post.
Brungerley Bridge.
Female Goosander.
Male Goosander.

I wouldn’t like to admit to having a favourite water bird ( I love to see them all) , but if you insist, I would probably say the Goosander . I always smile when I see these sawbilled ducks on the river, the female especially with her nut brown quiff . They are super adorable πŸ’–.

Smokey Polypore fungi…maybe.

Thanks for dropping by. Let me know if you have done the Birdwatch, seen Snowdrops or walked anywhere this weekend. πŸ₯ΎπŸ¦

On The Riverside.

Today was one of those days when I really wish I had taken my camera out with me, instead of just my phone. This frosty walk along the river from home to the village of Chatburn gave lots of photographic opportunities of the feathered variety. I counted Grey Herons, Little Egrets, Canada Geese, Moorhens, Kestrel, Goosanders and Wagtails .

We don’t often walk on the left hand side of the Ribble on this route for some reason, so it was nice to see the surrounding countryside from a different perspective. Clitheroe’s industrial landscape appeared sporadically in the distance.

Mute Swan.

Mary Horner’s attractive carved bench was particularly striking. Was she a shepherdess I wonder….

Alder catkins.

A type of polypore fungi.

After a brew and sausage roll in the village of Chatburn we chose to walk back home on the road, though another great way to get back to Clitheroe is of course along the other side of the river.

Thanks for joining me on a Winter’s day stroll.

The Elusive Bee Orchid.

Yesterday in the scorching heat we found the elusive Bee Orchid! This one was in Cross Hill Quarry Nature Reserve in Clitheroe, which can be accessed through Brungerley park. A kind member of a local wildlife group offered to show my sister, her kids and I where it was. 😊

There are over fifty species of orchid in the UK and all are protected. Although there are much rarer orchids ,the Bee Orchid is particularly striking I think. It’s flowers resemble the insect and amerous bees can transfer pollen to them, mistaking them for another 🐝 bee.

There were plenty of insects out in the late afternoon heat yesterday. We saw lots of butterflies including meadow brown’s, skippers, ringlets, common blues, tortoishell s, red admirals, whites and comma all fluttering around the quarry.

One of many many large skipper butterflies.

An unassuming orchid found all over the quarry is the Common Twayblade. I did not even realise that these are orchids.

A beautiful Marsh Orchid.

My niece got this picture of a cute new moth ( to us) , the Latticed Heath Moth.

The only Bee Orchid ( as yet) in the reserve has three flowers.

Bee Orchid.

My niece and Yellow Loosestrife flowers.

Heron intent on tea.

As you can imagine, wandering round a quarry in the heat made us all want to dive in the river, which luckily was close by. We all went for a paddle to cool off and the above heron wasn’t bothered by our presence at all.

Have you seen any orchids this year?

Clitheroe to Mitton Circular Walk.

Just a quick post featuring a walk today from home. We set out about 8 am hoping to miss the heat, it was already getting warm early on. Luckily for Hugo this is another route taking in the river Ribble ,so he had plenty of opportunities for paddles and swims.

Today’s walk is a circular route from Clitheroe to Mitton and back. It’s one we have walked a few times over the years.

Heading for the railway bridge.

Mearley Brook.

Approaching the Ribble Way.

There’s a newish photography aid down Edisford.

Edisford Bridge.

Quackers.

We have now crossed the bridge and are walking along the other side of the river towards Mitton. We pass through a little wood.

And carry on down the riverside.

Mama and brood.

Up through another little wood and we find this newly carved bear chair, which has appeared during lockdown.

We follow the footpath signs to Mitton, passing Great Mitton Hall.

Over the bridge near the Aspinall Arms.

The Aspinall arms is somewhere we would ordinarily stop off at for refreshment. Huge beer garden and dog friendly.

Next to the pub footpaths can be followed back to Clitheroe.

I heard a piping call. It belonged to a Common Sandpiper.

Nearly home and more content cattle relaxing in the sun. πŸ™‚

Have you got out and about this weekend?

Down by the river in Clitheroe.

This morning Hugo and I headed down to the river Ribble on one of our usual walks. I thought I would share some photos on here.

A glance back at the castle.

Weir.

Waddow Hall, which is used as a base for Girl Guiding UK.

River Ribble.

We walked to Brungerley park where there is a Sculpture Trail , which I blogged about previously.

I never noticed this bench in Brungerley Park before with its snake arms.

Three fish sculpture.

Heading through Brungerley park.

See the swan.

Bush vetch.

Otter sculpture.

Someone’s name perhaps?

Hunched heron.

Here’s my close up.

Watching for wildlife. πŸ™‚

Watery poem.

Brungerley bridge view.

Female Black cap.

Banded Demoiselle.

Sunbathing.

Loving the sunshine at the moment. ❀️

Worsaw Hill Walk.

Before the sun broke through the clouds yesterday and all the social distancing sunbathing and street parties commenced, we headed out for a walk up Worsaw Hill. The grassy limestone knoll is walkable from my hometown of Clitheroe, we managed an eight mile circular route before lunch time. πŸ™‚ Here are a few images from our morning.

Lambs and Pendle Hill.

Blossoming Horse Chestnut Tree.

Hello Nanny 🐐.

Sheep sculptures ~ Worston Village.

Bunting ~ Worston Village.

Footpath sign after the Calf’s Head pub in Worston.

Footpath with Worsaw Hill ( I only took one actual picture of the hill itself, doh! ) In the distance.

Curious cows.

Water Avens.

View to Pendle Hill from ( almost the top of ) the much smaller Worsaw Hill.

View of Pendle. We rested and ate an Aldi version of a Tunnocks Tea Cake. Hugo had half an apple. πŸ™‚

Downham Hall and Church from the other side of Worsaw Hill.

And views toward Kemple End and Clitheroe.

Violets.

Pretty path towards Chatburn village.

Tortoishell butterfly.

From Chatburn we headed for the river. Hugo had again rolled in something dead! Time for a dip.

The Ribble between Chatburn and West Bradford Bridge.

Bad dog! πŸ™„

Mute Swan.

Any ideas botanist bloggers? On the Riverside.

Canada Geese.

Dandelion clocks.

Hanson Cement works on the outskirts of Clitheroe.

Heron doing a Greta Garbo. πŸ˜…

Dusky Cranesbill.

This was a quiet walk with great views, wildlife and if done in the future, places to find refreshment. Also for film buffs, Worsaw Hill appears in Whistle Down The Wind , which was made locally.

Thanks for joining us. Hugo is clean again. 😘

Early April ~ Wildflowers On A Walk.

We are quite lucky in our small town that we are within easy walking distance of countryside. The river Ribble is best followed on foot if you want to spy the wildflowers that are springing up everywhere. Wildlife just keeps calm and carries on. πŸ™‚

River Ribble towards West Bradford Bridge.

Marsh marigolds often to be found near water. They are also called King Cups.

Pretty in pink Cuckoo Flowers herald the return of Spring…and the Cuckoo. Also called Ladies Smock and milkmaid.

Lots of Butterbur on the Riverside. In the past its large heart shaped leaves were used to wrap butter.

Primroses, Wood Anemone and Celandines.

Although some people have spotted otters here in Clitheroe, I have never seen a real one locally. Keep hoping!

Colts Foot.

Dog Violets. πŸ™‚

Pied Wagtail. There were a few darting round the river.

Wood Anemone. Saw lots of these bonnie white flowers carpeting woody areas.

Catkins.

Just too pretty not to photograph. Snakes Head Fritillaries in a front garden on the way home.

This walk was yesterday’s. What wildlife have you spotted recently?

A bird and a poem ~ Little Egret.

A few weeks ago I couldn’t resist buying a little book of poetry from a book fair that I came across. The anthology is full of beautiful poems about…..birds. And each one is paired with a gorgeous illustration. The book is actually a collection of stunning avian art works that can all be found in The British Museum. It is therefore called The British Museum Birds and if you find a copy, I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do. πŸ™‚

Anyway I thought it might be a nice idea to pair the poetry in the book with my own photographs on here occasionally. Though I am cheating a bit today as these pictures of a Little Egret were taken by my other half on our walk by the river Ribble on Saturday. I think its quite unusual to see egrets inland, but this one has been spotted here in Clitheroe a few times recently.

The illustration in the book is Egret On Willow In Snow , a hanging scroll painting on silk by Oda Kaisen ( 1785-1862).

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Snow

In the gloom of whiteness,

In the great silence of snow,

A child was sighing

And bitterly saying : ‘ Oh,

They have killed a white bird up there on her nest,

The down is fluttering from her breast!’

And still it fell through that dusky brightness

On the child crying for the bird in the snow.

Edward Thomas ( 1878-1917)

Little Egret. Photo Credit D Wilson.

Sorry the first poem I included is quite sad. But I hope you liked it anyway. X

A waterfall walk in the Dales.

Last Sunday we decided to take Hugo on a proper long walk ie somewhere different to the usual trudge down the fields and back. After checking the weather forcast we grabbed our walking boots and headed for the Dales, where it was meant to stay dry until at least after lunch. πŸ˜‰

I had found an 8km ( 5 mile) walk starting from the village of Stainforth near Settle in a Northern Eye book called Top 10 walks to WATERFALLS. The route takes in two waterfalls Catrigg Force and Stainforth Force as well as moorland and riverside. We parked at the pay and display car park in the village and followed the ‘Pennine Bridleway’ up the fellside.

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The view as we headed out of the village.

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Belted Galloways on the hillside.

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Sign for Catrigg Force or Foss.

It wasn’t long before we came upon Catrigg Force, tumbling 50ft down into Stainforth Beck. The falls and surrounding area were explored often by composer Sir Edward Elgar, who would stay in nearby Settle when visiting his friend and fellow musician Dr Charles Buck. Maybe the peaceful Yorkshire Dales inspired his compositions…

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Catrigg Force.

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You may be wandering why I am dangling a pink and green toy dog over a waterfall?? This is Sybil and these cute stuffed dogs are made by a group on facebook called Hounds4Huntingtons in exchange for donations to the Huntington’s Disease Association. Sybils love adventures so I shall take her on a few of mine. If you like , check out their facebook page or Sybil_On_Tour on Instagram. 😁

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A lonely old barn.

After admiring the waterfall we continued on until Higher Winskill Farm where we had to walk through a field of these magnificent beasts! They seemed quite interested in us but pretty friendly.

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I think we took a wrong turn at Higher Winskill and we ended up on the moorland road that leads into the village of Langcliffe , instead of taking a footpath there. Luckilly the road was quiet and the scenery lovely. The rain was moving in however and by the time we got to Langcliffe it was pouring down.

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St John the Evangelist Church, Langcliffe.

Langcliffe looked a nice village but disappointingly there was nowhere to shelter from the bad weather. No pub, no cafe and no shop. 😦 We persevered on , crossing a railway and a weir over the river Ribble.

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The weir at Langcliffe.

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One of the less muddy parts of the riverside.

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Hugo negotiates a stone style.

The rest of the walk followed the Ribble, a river that flows through my hometown of Clitheroe as well. We continued on past a caravan site and eventually we were rewarded with the cascading Stainforth Force and an old pack horse bridge. Happilly by this time the rain stopped long enough to pose for a few photos. 😁

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Stainforth Force.

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The old packhorse bridge dated 1675.

After crossing the old packhorse bridge we followed the short road back to Stainforth itself to complete our waterfall walk.

Have you any waterfalls near you? What is your favourite waterfall walk?