Tag Archives: Scotland

Great Cumbrae ~ Scotland’s most accessible Island. 🏝️

Did you know that there is an island off the West Coast of Scotland that is only a 10 minute ferry crossing from the mainland? Great Cumbrae is one of two islands known as The Cumbraes, they lie between the island of Bute and the seaside town of Largs in North Ayrshire. Little or Wee Cumbrae can be accessed from its larger cousin Great Cumbrae, but it is Great Cumbrae aka The Isle Of Cumbrae that I am visiting today.

Calmac Ferries run ferries every 15 minutes to the island from Largs. And tourists have been travelling over to the seaside resort of Millport on Great Cumbrae for decades. In fact some thirty odd years ago my Uncle Tommy and Auntie Joyce took my family over and we cycled around the Island. We have some happy memories of that time and I’ve always hoped to repeat the experience. So when my sister booked us a family holiday nearby, an island visit was definitely on our itinerary.

A Calmac Ferry docked at Largs.
All aboard for the 10 minute crossing.

The 10 minute crossing was quick and efficient. We went as foot passengers, but you can take your car along too. Many people travel with their bicycles and dogs are welcome on board. You don’t have to book, but you can if you like. Here’s the Calmac Website for guidance.

Once on the island there are buses waiting to transport travellers the 4 mile journey into Millport if they so desire. Most of Great Cumbraes inhabitants live in the pretty coastal town , which curves around an attractive bay.

Millport.

Millport has a couple of well stocked Bicycle Hire Shops on the main Street , so if your interested in riding around the island, you are spoilt for choice. As for the journey round?? Well it’s a 10 Mile mostly flat route that hugs the coastline. Perfect for a family outing!

Mapes of Millport Bicycle Hire.

Now, we always knew it was probably going to be difficult getting Mum on a bike. She’s In her seventies, with a dodgy knee, I don’t think we all quite thought the logistics through. Especially as Mum hasn’t actually ridden one in over 50 years. And looking back to our trips to Cumbrae, Mum never actually ventured out with us on a bike, even then. Ooops! As determined as poor Mum was to cycle out of Millport , it wasn’t to be. I ended up volunteering to look around the town with her, whilst the others pedalled away. Wil too had forgone the bike ride, to take our dog Hugo for a walk instead. That was my fault though, as I had suddenly jibbed out of putting H into a doggy daycare in Largs. Over-protective Dog Parenting issues…….

Garrison House.

Mum and I took a walk along the promenade and a rather grand looking piece of architecture struck our interest. The 18th Century Garrison House was built to house The Captain and officers of Revenue Ship ‘ The Royal George ‘ which was stationed at Millport, The Royal George played a part in catching smugglers that frequented the area. Today the impressive building contains a Doctor’s Surgery, Council Offices, Library, Cafe, Shop and Museum , it’s quite a hub for the community. Mum and I had a quick look in the Museum and around the pretty sunken garden.

Who knew Valentine cards could be so vicious ! Vinegar Valentines featured in the museum…
Part of the Lighthouse Exhibition.

Another building that we noticed in Millport was The Wedge. Though this abode on Stuart Street is definitely a blink and you’d miss it type of place ! The frontage of the skinny terrace is only 47 inches wide, which means that The Wedge has earned its place in The Guinness Book Of Records, as The World’s Narrowest House. Happily The Wedges shape does mean that the living space widens to 11 feet at the rear. I spied a Purple Bricks sign in the upstairs window and yes the petite property is currently for sale. Anyone fancy buying a Bijou Bolt hole ??

Wedged In…

Time for a brew? On a sunny Thursday morning at the end of August, we would have expected more of the towns shops and cafes to be open, but sadly quite a few were closed. I think perhaps because Scotland’s children returned to school after their summer holidays in mid August, it was no longer the height of the tourist season. The Dancing Midge Cafe ( love the name! ) seemed to be doing a roaring trade however.

The Dancing Midge.
Wil and Mum ( and Hugo) on the promenade.

After purchasing hot drinks to take away, Mum and I sat on the seafront watching the world go by. It wasn’t long before Wil and Hugo arrived back from their walk, joining us for a brew.

Opposite the Dancing Midge Cafe there is a jagged piece of rock called The Crocodile Rock. Astonishingly the brightly painted beast has been the subject of paintings and photos since 1913, when its creator Robert Brown adorned the landmark with its crocodilian features. 🐊

Crocodile Rock.
A watery stone jettie . Little Cumbrae in the distance.
The sea was full of jellyfish.
Mum on the pier.

The cyclists arrived back after a couple of hours. Seals and seabirds had been seen. Some legs were tired, some opted to pedal around the island again ! Wil and I would leave Hugo with the family and bicycle around Cumbrae with my nephew and my cousin who had joined us for the day. So after a take-out lunch from The Dancing Midge, four of us set off on our bike ride.

The cyclists returned.

The 10 Mile loop around Great Cumbrae has plenty of stopping off points to admire the beautiful views, across to the mainland and also toward the islands of Bute and Arran. We didn’t stop too many times though, as the hire bikes had to be back by a certain time. Unlike the others , I’m not the fastest on two wheels!

I think it took us about 2 hours to cycle around the island. There are various viewing points and things to see, some of these are incorporated into The Cumbrae Sensory Trail, we passed the green waymarkers on our way round. Another painted rock was spied. The Indian Rock spookily peers out from under trees on the West side of the island. It has been here since the 1920s and was reportedly first painted by a hermit called ‘ Fern Andy’. Nearby the rock is The Fintrybay Cafe, an ideal place to stop off for refreshments.

Sensory trail sign.
Can you see the Red Indian Rock?
A Grey Seal enjoying the sunshine.
Cycling selfie.
Incredible blue sea and the mountains of Arran in the distance.

I was so glad I had gotten to pedal around The Isle of Cumbrae once again, and especially so, on such a beautiful afternoon. My legs were pretty tired by the time we got back to Millport! The rest of the family had been rock pooling and playing crazy golf in our absence.

Crazy Golf.
The Isle of Cumbrae Distillery makes a selection of gins including Croc Roc Gin.
Another view from Millport.
My niece reunited some recently beached Moon Jellies, to the sea.
A fab sweet shop.

I have fallen in love with Great Cumbrae once again!

Have you ever been? Which of the Scottish islands is your favourite?

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A Wee Borders Break.

We were recently to be found just over the border in Scotland for a wee break and a complete change of scenery. Our home for two nights was a cute Victorian cottage at Reston called Coveyheugh Lodge. Set in a wooded valley between a railway line and the busy A1, it isn’t quite as peaceful as it looks! However we weren’t put off by the occasional noise, as this home away from home is a wonderful base for exploring the lovely East Scotland coastline.

Our home for 2 nights.
Toasty wood burner.
Patio Garden.
Morning walk.
Signage for nearby Mill.

Although we had originally planned a couple of walks in the local area, we hadn’t realised that poor Wil would still be recovering from sciatica. So what we did was some gentle pottering. Luckily there were fascinating places to visit, only a short drive away.

EYEMOUTH.

This small fishing town was once a smugglers paradise. It’s location just North of the border meant it was the nearest Scottish port to the Continent. Tea and Spirits were duly smuggled. A handsome Quayside house Gunsgreen House was apparently built on the proceeds and today houses a museum and smugglers trail.

Gunsgreen House.

Eyemouths natural harbour is a working fishing harbour and a river called ‘ Eye Water ‘ flows into it. πŸ™‚ Grey Seals can often be seen here, though I suspect this may have something to do with the seal feeding point at the water’s edge. Although it was lovely to see them, I do question whether wild seals should be fed in this way, incase they come to depend on the food. What do you think?

Grey Seal waiting for fish.
Grey Seal.
Eider Duck.

A tragic time in Eyemouths maritime history is brought to life in an evocative and moving sculpture on the sea front. Widows & Bairns by Jill Watson depicts the waiting wives and children of men whose fishing vessels were struck down in the fatal storm of 1881, killing 179. The frantic gestures of the fishermen’s families are heartbreaking to see , especially when many of the boats were destroyed so close to shore ; the sea was just too rough to contemplate rescue. The loss was Scotland’s worst ever fishing disaster.

Widows and Bairns is also known locally as ‘ Black Friday’
A very emotive piece.

Eyemouth has a really nice sandy beach ( not pictured 🀣 ) , a couple of pubs with seafaring names like The Contented Sole and we shared fish & chips on the quayside from Giacopazzi’s.

Eyemouth Beach.
Chippy Dinner.

COLDINGHAM BAY.

My pictures really don’t do Coldingham Bay justice. It’s the prettiest little sandy inlet, in-between Eyemouth and St Abbs. On our visit this sheltered beach was a balmy 16Β°c, not bad for the last Wednesday in October. As well as lots of golden sand, there are tidal rock pools and colourful beach huts. What a gem of a setting.

Colourful Beach Huts.
Rocky Shore.

The bay has a Beach cafe ( closed on our visit), toilets and car park. St Vedas Surf Shop was doing a roaring trade in paddle boarding , coffees & cake. I can imagine this place getting busy in the Summer.

ST ABBS.

Just North of Eyemouth is the picturesque fishing village of St Abbs. It’s dramatic backdrop of jagged purple cliffs gives the harbour side fishermens cottages a very scenic setting. So much so that St Abbs doubles as Thor’s home New Asgard in the Marvel movie Avengers : Endgame. I can’t say I’ve watched any of the recent Avengers films but I can see why the village was picked, it does have a Scandinavian look about it.


New Asgard sign.
St Abbs.
Ebbcarrs is famous for its fresh crab sandwiches.
The harbour.
Jetty.
Another jetty juts out onto the rocks.

And at this time of year St Abbs has its own Pumpkin Patch. πŸ™‚ Love it……

St Abbs Memorial.

Just outside of the St Abbs Visitor Centre there is another Jill Watson Memorial. St Abbs did not escape the tragic storms that took so many fishermens lives back in 1881.

St Abbs Head

The cliffs at St Abbs Head are home to various seabirds who make their home on the rugged ledges. And there’s a Grey Seal colony here too. We didn’t walk the cliff top paths of the Nature Reserve , definitely something to think about doing next time. What a wild and unspoilt headland.

I hope so!

The places we visited are joined by the Berwickshire Coastal Path .

Bye for Now. πŸŽƒ

Edinburgh.

When Wil and I visited Edinburgh recently ,we decided to leave be the usual touristy venues such as the Castle, the Camera Obscura, Mary Kings Close and the Scottish National Gallery. All these wonderful attractions are definitely worth visiting ( and we will again, I am sure), but we wanted to explore some other parts of this beautiful city.

The Scottish Capital has extensive parks, extinct volcanos, hidden bars, Harry Potter inspired locations and the most listed buildings in the world. Here are a few images from our trip.

View of Arthur’s Seat from Edinburgh Castle. The peak is an ancient volcano, sitting 251m above sea level.

A William Wallace performs on the Royal Mile.

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A fairy on the Royal Mile.

The colourful curving Victoria Terrace is full of quirky independent shops, and happens to be the main inspiration for Diagon Alley, apparently. J. K. Rowling lived and wrote in the city, so could indeed be true.

Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Garden is just one mile from the city centre, and well worth the walk, if your feeling active. I must admit I was dying to visit the ornate glass houses, of which there are ten. The Victorian Temperate Palm house below is one of the tallest traditional Palm houses ever built. Because it was quite nippy, it was nice to keep warm inside for a while, so I recommend a Winter trip. Look out for the Gardens cat, a handsome black Tom, called Milo. I didn’t manage to get a picture, but he’ll be the one being fussed over by the tourists. πŸ™‚

You can enter the Palm House for free, and there is a charge to explore the other glass houses.

I think we are in the Cacti Glass House here.

There are lots of quite tame grey squirrels in the park.

From the Botanic Gardens it is a pleasant walk alongside the Water of Leith into Stockbridge, an area of Edinburgh with lots of green spaces and a friendly village atmosphere. It’s plethora of independent shops and cafes makes Stockbridge a great place to linger.

Entrance to Stockbridge Market, a popular Sunday Market.

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Little Free Library.,

A lovely independent bookshop we found called Golden Hare Books on St Stephen Street.

Golden Hare Books.

Cheese and wine in Smith & Gertrude.

Edinburgh is a walkers city! We followed the Dean Path along the waterside to the Dean Village, a beautiful Edinburgh suburb. An Instagrammer’s delight , the Dean Village is incredibly picturesque, but bring a picnic if your planning to eat here. There are no shops or cafes, though plenty in nearby Stockbridge.

St Bernard’s Mineral Well. A statue of Hygeia ` Greek Goddess of Health’ resides here.

Dean Village.

Well Court, Dean Village.

One place we reserved a table for dinner was ‘ The Witchery By The Castle‘ near the castle gates. Fine dining in a gothic setting, this restaurant may set you back a few quid, but it is in a very atmospheric setting and the food is mouth watering.

The Witchery By The Castle.

Dessert at the Witchery. Yummy!

We also discovered some almost hidden bars on our explorations round Edinburgh. Venture down any ginnel off the Royal Mile, and you will find a traditional real ale pub such as The Jolly Judge ( look out for the nearby Writers Museum) and The Jinglin’ Geordie. If your preference is cocktails, The Devil’s Advocate in the Old Town and Brambles in the New Town are both quite hidden from the hustle and bustle, but can get busy even so.

On the Sunday before catching our train home, we took a stroll up Calton Hill which is home to several skyline monuments. From here there are far reaching views over the city and some quite interesting structures, including a building that was once called ‘Scotland’s Disgrace’. It is in fact a half finished replica of the Athens Parthenon , a tribute to the fallen of the Napoleonic Wars. The money ran out and building of the National Monument was never completed. I quite like it though! Other iconic buildings include The Nelson Monument, The Royal Observatory and Rock House, which you can actually rent as a holiday let.

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Nelson Monument.

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Dugald Stewart Monument.

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Royal Observatory.

National Monument.

So there you have it, a weekend in Edinburgh.

Where do you like to visit in the city?

2018 In Photos.X

Wow, its the end of another year and happily its been an enjoyable one. πŸ™‚ Its always nice to do a round-up post and I originally found this idea on Bev’s Blog, way back when. Next year I will have been occupying this little space in the blogger sphere for seven years. How did that happen! I still feel a constant compulsion to share my life with you all ~ so here’s my 2018 in photos……..

Walking in Whitewell with my sis.

In January I started a walking challenge. Inspired by fellow blogger Christine, I signed up for the #walk1000miles challenge and joined this helpful facebook page for ideas and motivation. The idea is to walk 1000 miles in twelve months. I was pretty confident I could do it, but how fast? Also in January Wil and I spent A Long Weekend In The Lake District. , where we walked round Derwent Water and made snow angels in the snow. πŸ™‚

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Snowdrops at Hornby Castle.

February was abundant with snowdrops this year, so I dragged Wil on a Snowdrop Walk near Morecambe and we also saw lots on an amble round Skipton Woods.

We spent the most freezing cold night away in Haworth in March. I have never felt so chilly!

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Great Wall Of Four Stones, Bentham.

By April Spring had arrived at last! I was still donning my walking boots more than my party shoes. We explored the Tolkien Trail in nearby Middle earth country and discovered this countries very own Ayers Rock on the Lancashire/Yorkshire border.

From what I remembered of May, it was hot! This months adventures included a night away in Manchester ( loved the street art in the Northern Quarter), making terrariums, finding a A Mermaid in the Trough Of Bowland. , camping in the Lakes and conquering my first of the Yorkshire Three Peaks.

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My God daughters at ‘Break in the Clouds’.

The wonderful weather continued in June. We had another camping weekend at Bolton Abbey. I walked up another of The Yorkshire Three Peaks and went to a Festival in Gisburn Forest. Fabulous Summer memories.

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Lou and I at Another Place.

It was amazing to catch up with my old school friend/now Canadian citizen Lou in July, after not seeing her in nine years. She hasn’t changed a bit!

Highlights from August included reaching 1000 miles in the #walk1000miles challenge. Yay! I didn’t stop walking though. I kept those boots on and hoped to reach 1500 miles by the end of the year. This month Wil, Hugo and I had the best holiday in Scotland with two weeks spent exploring North Uist in the gorgeous Outer Hebrides and Kilmartin Glen.

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Three Chimneys ~ The Yorkshire home of the Railway Children.

Lots of walks in September , my favourite being a Railway Children Walk around Haworth, finding locations from the classic film.

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Woodland walk, Bolton Abbey.

Autumn arrived and so did crunching through leaves. We went for a Spooky walk with family in the grounds of Bolton Abbey.

November is my Birthday month so another trip was planned. πŸ™‚ Stopped in Ravenglass on the Cumbrian Coast for a few days with friends, went to a chocolate making evening and enjoyed a birthday night out round Clitheroe.

And so it is December and 2018 is nearly at an end. I feel like its been an enjoyable month and looking back, a pretty fantastic year !

Enjoying a Wham Tribute Night in December!

Having walked 1649 miles this year too, I am definitely motivated to carry on walking in 2019, and hopefully get even more mileage under my belt.

Thanks again for stopping by. Wishing you lots of great adventures in 2019. X

Wildlife Moments in 2018.

Its December everyone! Is it to early to do a bit of a round-up post?? 2018 has been a pretty good year for spotting wildlife I’ve never seen before. I glimpsed my first Gannets plunging into the ocean for fish off Skye, my first Stonechats darting between fence posts and gorse bushes in Ravenglass and my first Great Crested Grebes fishing in the lagoon at Hodbarrow Nature Reserve. I witnessed my first Eider Ducks bobbing along an aquamarine blue sea in the Outer Hebrides and watched for the first time, wild otters swimming and playing in a sheltered cove there.

And this year I have tried to identify and record every flower, mammal, bird, butterfly and moth I have come across whilst out and about , in a Nature Diary. Doing this has definitely got me busy looking up everything in my often neglected wildlife guides. My diary has gotten quite full, though I know there are still so many plants and animals, that I haven’t had the pleasure of viewing in our beautiful British Isles.

Here are just a few photos of some of the wildlife I have managed to capture on camera this year. πŸ™‚

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Great Crested Grebe fishing whilst sporting winter plumage ~ Hodbarrow Nature Reserve, Haverigg, Cumbria.

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Hugo amongst Sea Lavender in Heysham, Lancashire.

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Hedgehog wandering up a woodland path, Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Dales.

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Underneath the Umbels, Clitheroe, Lancashire.

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Red Grouse, Great Stone of Four stones, Bentham, Lancashire.

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Small Heath Butterfly, Askham Fell, Cumbria.

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Compass Jellyfish on the beach, North Uist, Outer Hebrides.

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Common Seal, Isle of Bernerey, Outer Hebrides.

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Pretty Linnet, Askham Fell, Cumbria.

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Female Red Deer, North Uist.

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Blooming Heather on North Uist.

Swallow-tailed Moth, Salthill Nature Reserve in Clitheroe.

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Common Spotted Orchids in the Wildflower meadow, Gisburn Forest, Lancashire.

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One of the Otters we saw on North Uist. πŸ™‚

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Corn Buntings, North Uist.

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Sea Holly, Crosby Beach, Merseyside.

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Painted Lady, Salthill Nature Reserve, Clitheroe.

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Bugles near Derwentwater, Cumbria.

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Dipper, Stridd Wood, Bolton Abbey.

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Skylark with lunch, Askham Fell, Cumbria.

Hope you enjoyed the photos.

What are your own favourite wildlife moments of 2018?

A week on a Scottish Island ~ North Uist in the Outer Hebrides.

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Rocky beach on North Uist.

Back in August ( was it really that long ago?) we made the journey North to the Isle of Skye, stopping overnight in the small ferry port of Uig, before our crossing to Lochmaddy on North Uist, the following afternoon. So why did we choose a remote island in the Outer Hebrides as our holiday destination?

Some years earlier we had enjoyed watching a TV show called Monty Hall’s Great Hebridean Escape, where marine biologist Monty Halls and his madcap dog Reubs stayed in a restored crofters cottage on North Uist whilst working as a volunteer Wildlife Ranger on the island. The TV programme definitely put the thought into our heads about visiting the Outer Hebrides but it wasn’t until eight years later that we were flicking through a Unique Cottages holiday brochure and saw the cottage they had lived in for six months had been renamed Montys Cottage and is now a holiday let. We decided to book it there and then. πŸ™‚

Over The Sea From Skye. Our time on Skye was brief but we did manage to visit a couple of places on the Saturday morning. After a comfortable stay in the Uig Hotel ( very friendly and welcoming, especially to our dog Hugo πŸ™‚ ) we took ourselves off to the mystical Fairy Glen. Its miniature round grassy hills, one of which is basalt topped and from a distance resembles a ruined castle, have been used as landscapes in fairy tale films ‘Stardust’ and ‘The BFG’. We also visited The Skye Museum Of Island Life at Kilmuir. This collection of thatched Highland cottages housed everything a typical crofters village would have needed to make a living from the land and the sea.

The crossing from Uig to Lochmaddy on North Uist takes a little under two hours. Caledonian MacBrayne Ferries operate services to the islands and we spent the trip up on the deck, watching shearwaters skim the surface of the water and gannets dive-bombing the waves. There are dog-friendly areas inside too, so this journey is easy to make with a four-legged friend. πŸ™‚

As we approached Lochmaddy we were welcomed by late afternoon sunshine and we couldn’t wait to get into the car and drive the 40 minutes north to our accommodation.

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Monty’s Cottage.

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Interior.

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Lochan in front of the cottage.

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Ruins on the way to the headland.

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Highland Cows on nearby beach.

Monty’s Cottage. Located down its own secluded lane, a few minutes walk from the sea at Griminish, Montys Cottage looks just like it does in the brochure. A cute white washed crofters cottage with a thatched roof and incredibly thick walls, surrounded by the most beautiful countryside. It felt surreal that this place where Monty Halls had mapped out walking routes for the islands and Reubs the dog had run free on the sands, was to be our home for a week. 😁. Inside the cottage was cosy and well equipped. The owner had left us fresh milk, bread, eggs ect, which did prove a godsend as there were no shops open the following day. Be prepared that shops in the Outer Hebrides don’t usually open on a Sunday!

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Compass Jellyfish.

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European Otter!

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Red deer on the way to Cheese Bay.

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Curious Seal.

P1090593 Female Wheatear.
Wildlife On North Uist. The landscape of North Uist is more like a waterscape. There are over 800 freshwater lochans on the island. The watery habitat is perfect for wading birds and for one of Britain’s more elusive species of mammal, the European Otter. European Otters will swim in seawater but also need to bathe in fresh water to protect their coats. We were lucky enough to be able to watch two otters playing in the sea nearby the cottage. A magical experience indeed. πŸ™‚ Other wildlife we spotted on North Uist included several birds of prey, red deer, grey and common seals, many beautiful wildflowers and….. jellyfish galore.

All this wonderful wildlife was on our doorstep, literally. Gaggles of greylag geese flew over every day, a merlin regularly hunted for small birds and field mice in the meadow next to the garden, seals watched us watching them as they bobbed in the bay and scores of compass and lion’s mane jellyfish washed up in one of the several little coves nearby. Corn buntings and countless other small birds make their home on North Uist and it’s neighboring islands. They are basically a nature lovers paradise.

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A typical traffic sign. πŸ™‚

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Balranald Rspb Nature Reserve, North Uist.

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Seal watching on Berneray.

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Snoozy seal and pal, Berneray.

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Our Lady of the Isles, South Uist.

Island Hopping. Very handily North Uist is one of several Outer Hebridean islands connected by causeway roads, making it very easy to visit it’s equally picturesque neighbors. Collectively they are known as The Uists. In the north is beautiful Berneray , which in my opinion boasts the most stunning beaches. All white sand and turquoise ocean. To the south is Benbecula and South Uist, both worth exploring too. And further South is pretty Eriskay , where Bonnie Prince Charlie first landed on Scottish soil. Eriskay is also the real-life location of the shipwreck and lost cargo that inspired the film ‘Whisky Galore’. We didn’t manage to visit the islands of Barra and Vatersay which are accessed by boat. Maybe another time!

Never ending sands, Sollas, North Uist.

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Eriskay. Beach in front of the Am Politician Bar.

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One of Berneray’s stunning stretches of white sand.

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South Uist. Beach near Howmore.

Life’s A Beach. How I long to stroll again on those never ending white sandy shores. The beaches in the Outer Hebrides can match any in the Caribbean I bet. Though we occasionally had to wrap up to walk on them..even in August! There are so many stunning stretches of sand that it’s hard to pick a favourite. 🌞

As you can imagine Hugo had a riot chasing sticks and balls along countless beautiful beaches. Our far from chunky labrador ended up almost whippet thin after a week in the Uists.

Berneray Shop & Bistro.

Lobster at Namara Seafood CafΓ©.

Food & Drink. I must admit we cooked most of our evening meals at the cottage, stocking up at the co op 5 miles away in Sollas. Having Hugo with us meant that we had to find pet-friendly places to eat and there are only a few on North Uist. We found both the Lochmaddy Hotel and Langass Lodge near Locheport to be excellent when it came to eating out. Both welcome dogs and have good locally sourced menus.

Wil was really happy when oneday by chance we discovered Namara Seafood Cafe. This place feels a bit like a hushed up secret ,as it is located in a remote working harbor at Kallin on Grimsay ( another small causeway island), miles off the beaten track. The cafe is part of a chandlery ( boat supplies shop) and is by no means posh. It does serve the best fresh lobsters and crab though, straight from the ocean. Wil was one happy man as he tucked into delicious lobster & chips for Β£13, sat on a bench outside.

Are there any pubs on the islands? Well, not many! And none within walking distance of Monty’s Cottage. In fact the only pub on North Uist is The Westford Inn which we never got round to visiting. It looks like a good one though, serves meals and is dog friendly.

Reflections ~This road ends sculpture is a sweeping ceramic tiled seat at Claddach Baleshore, North Uist.

Sanctuary is a road ends sculpture at Locheport, North Uist.

Mosaic Mackerel on the shoreline near the arts centre in Lochmaddy.

Public Art & Landmarks. The Uists are home to many artists and creative talents, so it was fun to search out the various sculptures and art instillations on the islands. Even in a week we did not find them all. Interesting historic landmarks include the Neolithic chambered cairn Barpa Langais at the top of Beinn Langais , resplendent in heather by August. Also look out for the Hut Of Shadows at Sponnish, which hides a camera obscura within.

Dotted round the islands are several working craft studios. I noticed beautiful pottery at Shoreline Stoneware in Locheport and bought a lovely print of the machair ( coastal wildflower meadows) at Puffin Studio Crafts on Benbecula.

Heather,Grimsay.

Hugo, Berneray.

Rocky coastline, Lochmaddy.

Clachan Sands, North Uist.

Monty’s Cottage.

Berneray. It’s western beach once stood in for Thailand in a tourist brochure!

Are the Uists for you?

If you don’t mind not seeing a soul when you walk on the beach, don’t mind a short drive to the nearest shop and don’t expect a phone signal or WiFi, you will love holidaying on these Hebridean Islands.

Walking, wildlife, stunning beaches, turquoise sea, friendly folk( when you bump into any πŸ˜‰), fresh seafood, creative art and spectacular scenery. What’s not to love!

The Uists are definitely for us..X

A stroll along the Crinan Canal, Britain’s most beautiful short cut.

On the last day of our holiday in Scotland ,we discovered the serenely beautiful Crinan Canal. Often described as ‘Britains Most Beautiful Short Cut’ , the waterway was completed in 1801, as a quick link between the West Coast and Islands and the Clyde Estuary. The 9 mile stretch of canal vanquished the need to travel round the coast of the vast Kintyre Peninsula, a very handy short cut indeed. 😁

After noticing a sign for Crinan near the village of Slockavullin, where we were staying, we decided to go exploring in the car. 15 minutes later and we found ourselves in this picturesque wee harbour village. It is here that the canal enters the Sound of Jura.

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Crinan village harbour.

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Watching the world go by, as Hugo keeps an eye on the cake.

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A pleasure boat sets out for a cruise.

The quayside is an ideal spot to sit with a coffee and watch the world ( and their beautiful boats) go by. Queen Victoria herself took a trip up the canal in 1873.

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A moorhen hitching a lift. πŸ™‚

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Interpretation boards along the tow path tell the waterways history.

We decided to take a short stroll along the tow path, keeping Hugo on lead, as he is prone to jumping into canals given half the chance. The beauty of this walk, the wonderful watery views! On one side you have the calm Crinan canal, and on the other, the coastal vistas of the River Add Estuary.

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Duntrune Castle looks out toward Crinan. It is said to be haunted by the ghost of a handless Piper.

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Rosebay willowherb turning fluffy.

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Sleepy Duck.

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All aboard!

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Lock and Keepers Cottage.

Our short stroll took us past several boats negotiating the locks. It feels rude to stop and watch though. I’m sure I would get pretty flustered if I had a crowd eyeing my every move! In days gone by the Crinan Canal saw sailing and fishing vessels pass through, as well as Clyde Puffers.

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Fraser MacIver on his roof.

We soon came across a man fixing his waterside cabin roof. I am pretty sure he is the artist who uses the colourful caravan below as a studio.

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Artists studio.

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Art Honesty Box. πŸ™‚

I helped myself to a leaflet that says ‘ Canadian artist Fraser MacIver has lived on the Crinan Canal since 1997, taking inspiration from his canalside environment; as well as from the beautiful surrounding Argyllshire countryside’. I left money for a couple of pretty painted postcards.

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Scabious on the estuary side.

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Has anyone ever explored more of the Crinan Canal?

Would you be tempted to try a canal boat holiday?

A cosy cabin in Slockavullin, Kilmartin Glen.

Although I am back to work now and therefore back to normality, writing blog posts about my trip gives me a chance to reminnis about what was a very enjoyable holiday. After spending a short time on Skye and a week on North Uist ( post coming soon!) ,we fancied a few days on the equally lovely Scottish mainland.

I had booked a cabin in Kilmartin Glen in the heart of Argyll using airbnb. The 1930s hut resembles a wooden train carriage and stands in a small orchard next to the owners garden. Costing a very reasonable Β£170 for 3 nights, the cosy cabin was full of thoughful touches, including a vintage style radio, a wood burning stove and a cupboard brimming with books and games.

The tiny village of Slockavullin where our accommodation was located is almost hidden away, nestled in woodland amongst the many ancient monuments ( 800 apparently! ) that reside in historic Kilmartin Glen. A thirty minute walk will lead you to the slightly larger village of Kilmartin ,where there is a village pub, cafΓ© and museum.

It was very easy to fall in love with the cabin. Its shape definitely reminded me of a train carriage or even the showman’s wagon in Cornwall that we stayed in a couple of years ago. β€˜The Duke’ at Spring Park ~ Our stay in a Showman’s Wagon.

However this cosy retreat was purpose built as a cabin and the present owners have lovingly created a darling holiday home from it.

One quirky touch was the outdoor bath-tub , the water can be heated by lighting a fire underneath. However I never did get round to trying an alfresco dip!

Hugo was eager to explore of course! There are plentiful walks on the doorstep, many lead you past ancient burial cairns, standing stones and stone circles.

Temple Wood Stone Circle.

On our walks we saw lots of……hooded crows. To be honest I got quite excited as there are none in my neck of the woods. πŸ™‚

And your never very far from a Highland Cow. The hardy breed originated in the Hebrides and the Highlands and is now found all over the world.

A short drive from Slockavullin is Dunadd Fort, the Iron-age remains are a steep clamber up a rocky outcrop, with stunning views of the surrounding countryside. Ancient Gaelic Kings were created here and the Footprint of Fealty was believed to be part of the Dal Riata Kingdoms coronation ritual. They must have had quite small feet though!

2km North of Kilmartin village is Carnasserie Castle, a ruined 16th-Century tower house.

Moine Mhor National Nature Reserve is one of the last wild, raised bogs left in Britain. 242 species of lichens have been recorded here and the reserve is home to the marsh fritillary butterfly and two pairs of nesting hen harriers.

And your never to far from the coast. Crinan Ferry Beach is a long walk or a short drive from the cabin. In the old days a little ferry took sheep and cattle over the estuary. I have a blog post waiting to be written about a lovely walk we did along the picturesque Crinan Canal.

But for now, back to our holiday abode, where the apples and plums in the orchard tempted me to make a crumble. And hot chocolate with marshmallows were very kindly supplied by the owners, as well as fresh milk, eggs, oatcakes, jams, juice and cereals. πŸ™‚

And after a packed day of exploring, little Hugo was always happy to snuggle by the wood burner. πŸ™‚

Future Scotland Posts will include our week in the Outer Hebrides and Britain’s most beautiful shortcut. πŸ™‚

Hawthorn’s Photo Scavenger Hunt ~ August.

I feel like I haven’t had my blogging head on for ages! But never fear, I am back. And feeling refreshed, from a lovely twelve night break on the West coast of Scotland. I thought I would ease back into the blogosphere by joining in with Hawthorn/Kate’s Photo Scavenger Hunt. This month she has chosen words that are homophones. That is, two or more words having the same pronunciation but different meanings, origins or spellings. I thought I would look through my recent holiday pictures…and hope for the best. πŸ™‚

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Tea/Tee. So I chose tea…as in a pudding we had for our tea, one evening in a cosy cabin in Slockavullin. Slockavullin might sound Scandinavian, but it is in fact a little village in Kilmartin Glen, Argyll. The cabin was set in a small orchard in the owners garden and as the trees were laden with apples and plums, what better idea than to make a crumble….And very tasty it was too. πŸ™‚

Thyme/ Time. How’s this photo for bath time? Our Slockavullin cabin had its very own outdoor bath tub. I never did try out alfresco bath time, much to my lasting regret. My only excuse being, our time in Kilmartin Glen was short and quite drizzly and chilly. If you like the look of this cabin, look for ‘peaceful cabin in Kilmartin Glen’ on airbnb !

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Aisle/ Isle. Most of our break away was actually spent in the Outer Hebrides on the Isle of North Uist, which is connected to Berneray in the North and Benbecula, South Uist and Eriskay in the South, by short causeway roads. To get to the Uists , we travelled to the Isle of Skye and then caught a ferry from Uig on Skye to Lochmaddy in North Uist. I absolutely loved my time there. The stunning white sandy beaches, turquoise sea and amazing wildlife, its all true. And definitely worth the journey!

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Fairy/Ferry. Whilst on Skye, we didn’t get that much chance to explore, as our short time there were basically stopovers, on the way to and from North Uist. We did however visit Fairy Glen, a strange other-worldly landscape in the hills above Uig. Grassy knolls, tiny lochans, and even a fairylike rock castle, all made for an enchanting diversion.

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Flour/Flower. Ah the wildflowers. There were so many of them adorning the Scottish Countryside, especially on the islands. The Outer Hebrides are known for their fertile low lying grassy plains called Machair, which in the Summer months are a riot of colour. I think these cornflower blue blooms are devils-bit Scabious.

My Own Choice. I shall return with posts about our trip to The Outer Hebrides and also our time in Kilmartin Glen. Let me leave you with a bench with a view! This viewing point on the island of Berneray is perfect for watching a colony of common seals. We spent quite a while there before taking Hugo for a run on the stunning white sands, further along the coast. πŸ™‚

Please check out Hawthorn’s Scavenger Hunt for more scavenger hunt posts tommorrow.

Sunday Sevens 31st December.

Here I am back again with the last Sunday Sevens of the year. Cannot quite believe how incredibly quickly 2017 has gone. Here are 7 photos from the last 7 days of December. 🌲

1. Christmas Morning ( beween present opening and lunch! ) a walk with friends and hounds, with a couple of kids thrown in for good measure. Our  friend Fi organizes this every year, so it has fast become tradition for anyone who is available to meet up. The location is always Brungerly Park which is home to the  ‘ Ribble Valley Sculpture Trail’ and we always have a standard photo taken by the festively decorated Sikka Deer sculptures. I think Hugo is in there somewhere,  hiding behind Sophie the deer hound. πŸ•

2. Another yearly Xmas Tradition found me joining in with Janet’s Thrifty Christmas Gift Swap. I always love hunting for gifts from craft fairs and charity shops  to send to my recipient, usually another blogger or instagrammer ( is that a word? ) that Janet matches me up with. This year I had to send to Janet herself and I found a few bits and bobs that I hope she likes. These included a Virginia Wolf book, a snowflake tree decoration, a small bottle of toffee vodka and a bundle of pretty fabrics , as I know she is a dab hand with a sewing machine. Sadly I forgot to take any pics but below is the lovely gift stash I got from Hanna , who lives in Washington DC. 🎁 I especially like the frosted fir scented candle and the plush pink mushroom tree decoration. Thanks Hanna. X

3. Hugo loved opening his presents. If he didn’t have his own, he would definitely be trying to open ours. 😁

4. Yet another Christmas Tradition!  When visiting Mum over the festive period ,the whole family gets together for a photo. My brother sets up the camera, then we have 10 seconds to scrabble into position. We basically have the same photo every year, with slight variations. In 2017 Mum is looking startled, Brother in law’s head is almost obscured by a light bulb, my Step Dad has his trouser buttons undone and Hugo is showing us his butt. Ho Ho Ho. 😁

5. My most favourite Christmas Tipple this year has been rhubarb & ginger liqueur from the Edinburgh Gin Distillery served with ice and ginger ale. Bottoms up! 🍸 

6. Well we have booked a holiday! Can you guess where we are going next Summer? Clue ~ rather remote and hopefully we shall see Sea Eagles and Corncrakes, white sandy beaches and crofters cottages. 😊 In fact we shall be staying in the crofters cottage above! 

7. I shall end this post and this year with a piccie of Miss Slinky enjoying her latest comfy spot on the sofa. πŸ™‚

See you in 2018. Enjoy whatever celebrating you do tonight. X