Tag Archives: walks

Temple Sowerby Walk. πŸ₯Ύ

Today’s walk is one from the weekend. A gentle saunter starting at NT Acorn Bank and taking in the pretty village of Temple Sowerby in the Eden Valley district of Cumbria. The route can be found on the Acorn Bank Website. Because we are members of the National Trust we parked on the car park at Acorn Bank. Non members may have to adapt the walk a little.

Shepherds Hut at Acorn Bank entrance.
Walk Map.
Beautiful Bluebells.
Pear Blossom and Daffodils.
Walking through Wild Garlic.
Crowdundle Beck, a tributary of the River Eden.
We passed under a railway viaduct.
What Ewe Looking At?
Bridge over the Beck.

We passed through a small village called Newbiggin , one of several Newbiggins in Cumbria. I love the rosie coloured sandstone that the buildings are made of. Here it was taken from Crowdundle Beck.

St Edmunds Church, Newbiggin.
A farmhouse at the crossroads built in 1695.
And curious cattle.
A bit of road walking. Very peaceful though.
Lots of stitchwort out in the hedgerows.
Distant Hare.
Heading through Borough Fields and on to Temple Sowerby.
Temple Sowerby through a ginnel.
The houses are set around a village green.
St James Church, Temple Sowerby.

Temple Sowerby is an attractive village , once known as the Queen Of Westmorland villages. It was named after the Knights Templar who briefly owned the settlement and nearby Acorn Bank. Temple Sowerby was once a tanning village and other industries in the area included the mini ng of gypsum. There is still a gypsum plant at Kirkby Thore.

Victory Hall.
The House at Temple Sowerby B & B. Cafe for residents and non residents called Temple Velo.
Lunch at Temple Velo.
Heading out of the village.
A short country lane walk and then we are back in Acorn Banks parkland.
Parkland.
Acorn Bank.
Mellow yellow.
Flowers galore.
A peek in the orchard.
Clock Tower.

After a look in the second hand book shop at Acorn Bank it was time to head home. What a lovely walk. 😘

January ~ Round Up. πŸ’–

I thought I would do a little round up post at the end of every month. Who else thinks that January has whizzed by!

READING ~ It’s been a gentle month of reading, easing me into 2022. Luckily there has been no need to buy new books or borrow any books, just yet. The first month of the year lends itself perfectly to making a start on lovely Christmas gifts , such as Angela Harding’s beautifully illustrated ‘ A Year Unfolding ~ A Printmakers View ‘. This gorgeous publication is packed full of Angela’s stunning prints of the wildlife she sees from her home in Rutland , her adorable hounds and holidays on the coast. Though late to the party I have also just finished reading Richard Osmons ‘ The Thursday Murder Club’ which I loved too.

WATCHING ~ I have watched quite a few good dramas on the box recently including ‘ Rules Of The Game’ starring Maxine Peake and David Tennant in ‘ Around The World In Eighty Days’ . My favourite show to binge watch in January was the excellent ‘ Afterlife ‘ on Netflix. I couldn’t help but blub at the end though. : ( And as for Guilty Pleasures ~ can’t help it, I’m becoming addicted to The Masked Singer as usual. πŸ˜‹

A Mitton Circular Walk.

WALKING ~ There have been a couple of gentle walks this month, nothing too strenuous though. I blogged about hikes in Lytham, Paythorne and Skipton Castle Woods. Hugo the Labrador always makes sure I get my steps in!

EATING ~ Wil made a delicious Burns Night Pie using Veggie Haggis , which went down well. I can’t find the actual recipe online but theres a similar one Here.

A friend and I had a delicious Belgian Waffle Breakfast at The Chocolate Works in Clitheroe recently. It’s the photo in the post header. All that fruit has got to be healthy, right. πŸ˜‹

ENJOYING ~ Regaining my sense of smell after covid and loving the scents of these Lakeland Lights Candles. Hand blended in Cleator Moor in Cumbria, I fell in love with these gorgeous creations after receiving two off my brother for my birthday in November. I treated myself to a couple more recently too. Ullswater ( Grandeur) and Whinlatter ( Forest ) are my faves. So far. πŸ™‚

Lakeland Lights Company Candles ~ Photo From the Facebook page.

~ Tartan. For some reason I am totally in love with tartan! I own a lovely tartan thermos flask and a snuggly & soft tartan blanket, both presents off my other half. They are perfect for keeping me toasty through the winter months and taking out on walks too.

~ Wordle. Google Wordle and find the online word game that everyone ( it seems like! ) Is becoming addicted to in January. The premise of finding a 5 Letter Word in less than 6 goes is both surprisingly simple yet sometimes frustratingly difficult. Enjoy!

Thanks for dropping by. πŸ₯°

Up Melmerby Fell.

I think we can safely say that our caravan in Melmerby is fast becoming our second home. Now that England is coming out of lockdown restrictions, we are hoping to spend more time there, hopefully at least two weekends a month. There’s still so much of the Eden Valley to be explored, not least from our own doorstep. Never one to suggest a hike up a hill, I left it to Wil to persuade me that a fell walk from Melmerby on a clear Spring day was a good idea. πŸ™‚

After breakfast at the van, we set off from the village, following a well defined track up through woodland and into the hills. And there are plenty of hills!  Melmerby sits at the foot of the mighty North Pennines.

Ford and stream.
Hills. ⛰️
Wil waiting for me….as usual.
Looking back.
Looking up.

Eventually after a lot of lagging behind I caught Wil and Hugo up. The views are extraordinary , with the Lake District fells and even the sea in sight on a clear day.

Hills and sky.
Perched on a hill..
Views across to the Lake District Mountains.
A Dunlin.  Although more commonly associated with the coast, dunlins breed in the uplands. This one wears it’s breeding plumage.
A rusty machine skeleton.
Another upland bird, the beautiful Golden Plover.

Now there are several summits in the fells above Melmerby. And Melmerby Fell is certainly one of the bigger ones at 709 metres ( not that much shorter than two of the Yorkshire 3 Peaks, and higher than Pen Y Ghent ) but sorting which cairn or trig belongs to which fell is a bit tricky.

Possibly Meikle Awfell.
Knapside Hill, maybe.
This unimpressive looking  Cairn is the top of Melmerby Fell. Yay!
A rest on Melmerby Summit.

Up on the tops the weather had turned from t shirt weather to something a bit more wild and cold. It even tried to snow! We soldiered on along the Maiden Way, a Roman road later used as a Drovers route.

Walking along the Maiden Way. Cross Fell in the distance, I think.
Rosy coloured sheep.
Along the Maiden Way.
Another fell bird ~ the pretty Wheatear.

We made our descent by following an old tramway , now almost given back to nature. It leads down to a large lime kiln by Ardale Beck. I think the kiln looks like a miniature castle. And then on to Townhead, Ousby.

Following the old tramline into the valley below.
Back of Townhead Lime Kiln.
Townhead Lime Kiln.
Below the hills we walked across.
A contented little lamb.

The final part of our walk took us along pretty country lanes from Ousby back to Melmerby.

St Luke’s Church, Ousby. Made from the rosy red sandstone so typical of the area.
A sheepdog sees us off.
Sheep jam on the way out of Ousby.
A pair of partridge.
A Tunncks Tea Cake back at the caravan.

In the end I was glad that Wil persuaded me to join him on this hike up Melmerby fell. πŸ™‚

Os explorer 0L31

11 miles ( 18km).

Walking in Cumbrias Eden Valley ~ Vivienne Crow.

.

Januarying.

I am treating January as I usually do. It’s my month of keeping snug and cosy inside, with a healthy dose of fresh air and exercise. I also like to plan holidays and weekends away at this time of year, so have been researching our little holiday in North Norfolk during May and weekend walks in the Eden Valley, for when we can get back up to the caravan.

Continuing Winter cheer with my window display. The Robins mimic my real life robin visitor. The hyacinth plant I found in Sainsbury’s for a bargain 65p is now flowering and giving off a delicious scent, resembling woods of bluebells.

Winter Walks.

I’ve been looking for more walks from home. Although I thought we had been just about everywhere on our doorstep, I was proved wrong last weekend, when we discovered new to us footpaths. I’m sure there are more to explore!

There will be another place to wander when Clitheroe’s new Nature Reserve opens. It is very local indeed. I have nosed over the fence a couple of times and I spied several Teal on the water. πŸ™‚ Can’t wait for a proper look.

The RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch is all set for the last weekend of January. I have signed up as usual and am looking forward to seeing which feathered visitors turn up in the hour.

Primrose Nature Reserve. πŸ¦‰πŸ¦‰ Photo from their Facebook page.
Bridgerton. It’s a bodice ripper.

Incase you are looking for some on screen escapism, here is a list of what I’ve enjoyed watching recently. Most are series and there’s one film. But let me say this, my list is one of mostly guilty pleasures. πŸ˜„

  • Bridgerton. Netflix. Regency romance with lots of drama, comedy, gossip & scandal.
  • Derry Girls. All 4 / Netflix. Coming of age comedy set during ‘ the troubles’ in nineties Northern Ireland.
  • Ghosts. BBC I Player. Spirited comedy about the ghostly inhabitants of a haunted house, from the creators of Horrible Histories
  • Winter Walks. BBC I Player. Join well known faces as they film their favourite walks in Yorkshire. I miss Yorkshire. ❀️
  • Eurovision Song Contest : The Story Of Fire Saga. Netflix. Very cheesy but enjoyable musical comedy film set in Iceland and Edinburgh.
  • The Masked Singer. ITV/ ITV Hub. Addictive crazy singing competition.
  • Home For Christmas. Netflix. Norwegian rom com series.
  • Sneaky Pete. Amazon Prime. Crime drama about a con man who assumes the identity of his cellmate to escape from a vengeful mobster.
  • The Queen’s Gambit. Netflix. An orphans rise against the odds to become the Worlds number one chess player.
  • All Creatures Great And Small. My 5. Heart warming 1940s comedy drama about a young vet who accepts a job in a Yorkshire Dales Vetinary practice. This is a remake of the original series, and just as good. ❀️
Winter Reading.

It’s nice to find a nice cosy read and I did in Winter Holiday from the Swallows and Amazon’s children’s book series by Arthur Ransome. I am immersed in a world of frozen lakes, snowy igloos and secret signals. Thanks to the What is it about books ? blog for the recommendation. ❀️

So this is my first foray into using the new WordPress editor. I hope it turns out okay.

Do leave me your own thoughts on how you are spending January?

Garrigill to Ashgill Force walk πŸ₯ΎπŸ

At the weekend we took a walk from Garrigill in the North Pennines to the nearby waterfall of Ashgill Force. We bought an Alston Moor walk leaflet in the outdoors shop in Alston for 60p.

The route begins at Garrigill’s Village Green, we parked near the village church. Garrigill looks to be a lovely little village , whose pub and shop have seen better days.

St John’s Church.

Village Green.

George and Dragon sign.

The leaflet says that there were once two pubs in Garrigill. The George & Dragon was the haunt of visiting gentry, Tories and shooting parties, whilst the Fox was for miners, poachers and Liberals!

Climb the slippy bridleway to Loaning Head.

A Loaning Head cottage.

Views across the Pennines.

Kestrel.

There are lots of very high Stiles to climb over.

Swaledale Sheep.

One moment, blue skies…

the next, sideways rain..

Meadow Cranesbill.

The weather went a bit wild and after navigating about a million steep stiles we came across the waterfall. Unfortunately we had managed to deviate from our maps directions somehow, but we got there in the end.

Gill scramblers at Ashgill Force.

Ashgill Force.

It is apparently possible to walk behind the waterfall, and indeed ‘ Dance with the Fairies’ , although it looked a bit busy with Gill Scramblers the day we visited.

Hugo was joined in the gorge by another Black Labrador boy, which would be lovely if Hugo actually liked other boy labradors. Fortunately Hugo was more interested in the stones Wil were throwing in the water, than fighting. Phew!

Labradors.

Footbridge.

The rest of the walk was more of a gentle meander, following the River South Tyne back to Garrigill.

An almost stone circle.

Another footbridge.

A beautiful place for a dip.

Fly Agarics beside the river.

Autumn colours.

Buzzard.

A mini waterfall.

Attractive stone bridge.

Hips.

And back to the church.

I really enjoyed this scenic 5 mile walk and hopefully we will try it out again, maybe when the meadows are full of wildflowers come early Summer. πŸ™‚

Back On The Tolkien Trail. πŸ§™β€β™‚οΈπŸ₯Ύ

Although I’ve posted about The Tolkien Trail on my blog before, I walked it again recently with my sister and family, and thought it worth another look. Undoubtedly this tranquil area of Lancashire inspired J. R. R. Tolkien , he often stayed here whilst visiting his son John who attended Stonyhurst College. The Lord Of The Rings author enjoyed walking in the lovely leafy Hurst Green countryside and local place names and landmarks made it into his writings.

On this occasion we followed the route starting at The Shireburn Arms , the 17th century Inn was named after the rich land owning Shireburn family. A river Shirebourn features in The Lord Of The Rings.

Hurst Green village centre.

A Tolkien quote near The Shireburn Arms.

A glorious clump of Purple Loosestrife. ❀️

Aqueduct.

Our walk very nearly got abandoned. At this point we were meant to be following the riverside but a herd of frisky cows showed too much interest in Hugo the Labrador. We made a hasty retreat up a hill and managed to rejoin the river later.

A house called ‘ Jumbles’ named after Jumbles’ rocks, pertruding stones in the river Ribble.

River depth gage.

Hugo.

Hacking Hall in the background.

The heavens kept opening ( and the sun shone too! ) as we followed the trail. To be honest the walk could really benefit from a few Lord of the Rings inspired sculptures or scribbles along the route, I reckon. Anyway above is Hacking Hall from where the Hacking Ferry boat still operated in Tolkien’s time at Stonyhurst. The ferry was possibly the inspiration for his ‘ Bucklebury Ferry’ .

This old oak is mentioned in The Woodland Trusts Ancient Tree Inventory.

Winckley Hall Farm.

Tree climbers.

Cromwell’s Bridge from Lower Hodder.

Cromwell’s Bridge over the river Hodder may have been the inspiration for Tolkien’s ‘ Brandywine’ bridge. It is named after Oliver Cromwell ,who along with his troops rode over the skinny stone structure, on their way from Gisburn to The Battle of Preston. We followed the riverside up through shady woodland past Hodder court.

Corn crops a long the Holder.

Cuckoo Pint Berry Stalks.

Windey path through the woods.

Up above.

Stepping out.

Eventually we ended up in the grounds of Stonyhurst college, though I didn’t manage to get many photos. And then back to the car parked in Hurst Green. The trail covered 6 or 7 miles in total.

Stonyhurst college grounds from behind.

Alm houses in Hurst Green.

I must confess I have never read any Tolkien, though I enjoyed watching The Lord Of The Rings films. When walking the trail you probably need to research the areas connections beforehand, as there is no signage or information on the route. Nevertheless this was an enjoyable hike around a lovely area. πŸ₯Ύ

Here is a recent post from The Bowland Climber who was in the area too.

The Tolkien Trail can be downloaded online and can be found in numerous local walk books. I used…

Walks Around Clitheroe ~ Terry Marsh.

Melmerby & Ousby Circular walk.

Here are a few images from a 5 mile walk we did on Saturday in The Eden Valley. This is a nice walk in some parts, but we definitely had issues with some very lively cattle, and had to keep making diversions to avoid them. I love cows the most when they are snoozy, and not galloping down a field toward you. πŸ€ͺ

Also, we had to finish the planned route by road ,as the crops in a cornfield we would have walked through ( on a public footpath) were being collected. It was a peaceful country road though, so not so bad.

We walked through Melmerby, passing rosy stone buildings such as this, the village store.

And a bee friendly area, not for mowing.

A pretty pink poppy, buzzing bee inside.

Bluetit on umbelifer.

A track that takes you up the fell.

But we turned right for Gale Hall.

And were passed by a trailer of bales.

Lane to Gale Hall.

Unsurprisingly Gale Hall is a farmhouse.

A calm cow. Unfortunately I didn’t think to get photos of the lively ones.

Think we are safe from cow stampedes in this field!

Distant crops.

I wondered what a Texas Gate is? It is in fact a cattle grid.

Pony who came for a pat.

Pretty pink mallows.

Feverfew.

Postbox in the Row, a part of the straggling village of Ousby.

Sheep being herded in Ousby.

Foxy pub sign.

A Robins Pincushion, which are created by a Gall wasp on wild rose bushes.

Once back in Melmerby I find a pretty painted pebble. πŸ™‚

Parts of this walk weren’t great, but I did get some nice photos from it at least. 😊

Weets Hill Walk. πŸ₯Ύ

We found a peaceful moorland walk on Sunday. I guess it was so quiet because of the drizzly weather. It soon fined up though and we happily abandoned our waterproof jackets. Yay!

Our walk started from a canal side car park near the Anchor Inn at Salterforth near Barnoldswick. This isn’t an area we have explored before and despite having a map and walking book we did get a bit lost ( shocker! ) but it all worked out ok in the end.

The route headed up into the rugged moorland of Weets Hill where there are fantastic views and even some unusual art work. Here are some images from our 6.5 mile hike.

Leeds & Liverpool Canal.

Canal side way marker.

Buttercup meadow.

A narrow squeeze style which I could barely squeeze through. πŸ˜…

Ground nesting birds sign. We made sure we kept to the bridleway.

This old track is called Lister Well Road.

Caught on camera.

Lister Well Road.

Lower Foulridge Reservoir…maybe. Anybody know?

I can’t help pointing out Lister Well Road ! Lister is my family name. 😊

Blacko Tower in the distance.

Cuteness overload ❀️.

Hungry horse.

Looking toward Pendle Hill.

‘ Heading’ for Duck Pond Farm.

There is actually a head at Duck Pond Farm. πŸ™‚

And another!

A former occupant ( an art teacher) made the large head sculptures.

Fitting all our big heads in a selfie.

Heading away from Duck Pond Farm. A beautiful white horse.❀️

Getting in some dawn chorus practice..

Cotton grass.

Buttercups.

Think there’s a troll under the bridge.

This is Hugo’s cute pose…..only done when he is watching someone eat. Look into my eyes!!

Meadow Pippit collecting nesting material.

Weets Hill Moorland.

Heath Bedstraw.

A Barnoldswick chimney.

Somebody’s watching me.

Foxglove.

Pink grass. Anyone know their grass? 😁

And back to the canal tow path.

The Anchor Inn….. apparently holds an impressive stalactite formation in the cellar.

This walk was definitely all about the views , the wildlife ( we were serenaded by the continuous chatter of pippits and skylarks) and those unforgettable sculptures at Duck pond farm.

Walking Book – Walking in the Forest of Bowland and Pendle by Terry Marsh.

Map – Explorer OL21 ( South Pennines).

Down by the river in Clitheroe.

This morning Hugo and I headed down to the river Ribble on one of our usual walks. I thought I would share some photos on here.

A glance back at the castle.

Weir.

Waddow Hall, which is used as a base for Girl Guiding UK.

River Ribble.

We walked to Brungerley park where there is a Sculpture Trail , which I blogged about previously.

I never noticed this bench in Brungerley Park before with its snake arms.

Three fish sculpture.

Heading through Brungerley park.

See the swan.

Bush vetch.

Otter sculpture.

Someone’s name perhaps?

Hunched heron.

Here’s my close up.

Watching for wildlife. πŸ™‚

Watery poem.

Brungerley bridge view.

Female Black cap.

Banded Demoiselle.

Sunbathing.

Loving the sunshine at the moment. ❀️

Worsaw Hill Walk.

Before the sun broke through the clouds yesterday and all the social distancing sunbathing and street parties commenced, we headed out for a walk up Worsaw Hill. The grassy limestone knoll is walkable from my hometown of Clitheroe, we managed an eight mile circular route before lunch time. πŸ™‚ Here are a few images from our morning.

Lambs and Pendle Hill.

Blossoming Horse Chestnut Tree.

Hello Nanny 🐐.

Sheep sculptures ~ Worston Village.

Bunting ~ Worston Village.

Footpath sign after the Calf’s Head pub in Worston.

Footpath with Worsaw Hill ( I only took one actual picture of the hill itself, doh! ) In the distance.

Curious cows.

Water Avens.

View to Pendle Hill from ( almost the top of ) the much smaller Worsaw Hill.

View of Pendle. We rested and ate an Aldi version of a Tunnocks Tea Cake. Hugo had half an apple. πŸ™‚

Downham Hall and Church from the other side of Worsaw Hill.

And views toward Kemple End and Clitheroe.

Violets.

Pretty path towards Chatburn village.

Tortoishell butterfly.

From Chatburn we headed for the river. Hugo had again rolled in something dead! Time for a dip.

The Ribble between Chatburn and West Bradford Bridge.

Bad dog! πŸ™„

Mute Swan.

Any ideas botanist bloggers? On the Riverside.

Canada Geese.

Dandelion clocks.

Hanson Cement works on the outskirts of Clitheroe.

Heron doing a Greta Garbo. πŸ˜…

Dusky Cranesbill.

This was a quiet walk with great views, wildlife and if done in the future, places to find refreshment. Also for film buffs, Worsaw Hill appears in Whistle Down The Wind , which was made locally.

Thanks for joining us. Hugo is clean again. 😘